Filling Pattern – No. 565

category: openwork filling pattern with Cable stitch grid
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 30 for the Cable stitches and No. 20 for the Rose stitches
stitches used: Cable and Rose stitches
center: intersection of pairs of fabric threads
one pattern segment: = 28 threads

The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.

First, establish an openwork grid with an intersection of pairs of threads in the center by cutting 2, leaving 2 both vertically and horizontally.

Stabilize the established grid with Single Faggot stitches worked from the back side of the fabric. Please remember that Single Faggot stitch worked on the back side will look likeCable stitch viewed from the front.

Then the desired pattern – made up of Rose stitches in squares of 4 x 4 stitches and “five-cubes” – is embroidered into the grid.

Bring needle up in the second square diagonally from the center

and embroiders a square of 4 x 4 Rose stitches around the center square of 2 x 2 remaining free squares.

From one corner of the resulting square, embroider 3 diagonal Rose stitches.

The fourth Rose stitch on this diagonal row is the corner point of the next square of 4 x 4 Rose stitches.
Slide the working thread on the back through existing stitches to the next emerging point

and gradually build up the pattern.

This pattern also looks very nice when it is placed diagonally in a motif area, as is the case here.

Filling Pattern – No. 564

A word on my own behalf:
As you will surely have noticed, I have lost my English editor. Thank you Joey for years of professional support and great cooperation. Now I have to manage on my own. Nevertheless, I really hope that my texts are somewhat understandable.

Filling Pattern – No. 564

category: Limet-Filling pattern
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 20
stitches used: Rose and Cable stitches
center: intersection of withdrawn thread lines (in other shapes or motifs: longitudinal axis = withdrawn thread line)
one pattern segment = 48 threads

In Schwalm whitework, it is common to embroider opposite or diagonally opposite motifs with the same filling pattern. However, experienced embroiderers, who have a very large treasure trove of patterns at their disposal, also like to use different but similar filling patterns.

The two following photos show two opposite corners of a tablecloth. One main tulip was decorated with Filling Pattern No. 563,

the opposite one with filling pattern No. 564 shown in the following. This pattern is similar, but with a segment width of 48 fabric threads a little more spacious.

Further examples for the different arrangement of the same or similar filling patterns can be found here:
Variety of Schwalm Whitework
Pretty Contemporary Schwalm Table Cloth
A Framed Schwalm Sampler (images 3 and 4)
Transition from Early to Later Schwalm Whitework (1) (image 1)
Early Schwalm Whitework – A Gorgeous Table Runner (image 1)
Traditional Schwalm Bodice (B) (image 1)

But now to the pattern itself.
The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.
First, establish a Limet grid with an intersection of withdrawn thread lines as center by alternately cutting 1, leaving 3, vertically and horizontally.

Bring needle up 1 square above the center and work a Rose stitch from there. Three more Rose stitches, each equally spaced, are worked around the center point.

After completing the fourth Rose stitch, the needle remains on the back.

The work is turned. From the last Rose stitch, cross 1 square to the right, insert

and rotate the work 45° clockwise.

The next stitches are embroidered from the back.
Now work 20 Cable stitches around the Rose stitches – five on each side. To do this, you cross 1 square diagonally to the left and bring needle up.

From the emerging point, move the needle diagonally to the top right, insert in the next hole and bring it up in the next one to the left. It is important that you also catch the working thread that runs from one stitch to the next. Always take care to keep the holes between the stitches well defined and open. As a result, the pattern appears clear and sharply defined in the end.

From the emerging point, move the needle diagonally to the bottom right, insert in the next hole and bring it up in the next one to the left.

From the emerging point, move the needle diagonally to the top right, insert in the next hole and bring it up in the next one to the left.

From the emerging point, move the needle diagonally to the bottom right, insert in the next hole and bring it up in the next one to the left.

The 5 Cable stitches of the first side are finished. The three remaining sides are processed in a similar way. However, since you have to insert directly at the last emerging point, the working thread must be passed under the existing stitches (the thread that runs from the penultimate to the last Cable stitch and a leg of a Rose stitch) so that the holes remain open.

You can then return to the last emerging point and embroider 5 Cable stitches from there in the established way. It makes sense to turn the work so that you can move the needle always horizontally from right to left.

After completing the twentieth Cable stitch, the round is closed. From the emerging point, move the needle diagonally down to the right, insert the next hole there,

turn the work and continue embroidering on the front side again. The current emeriging point is the center of the first Rose stitch

A total of 16 Rose stitches are worked around the Cable stitch rhombus.

With the center section complete, it now makes sense to create the Rose stitch grid for the entire pattern.
From the center of the last Rose stitch, move the needle 1 square to the left, bring it up and from here work a diagonal row of Rose stitches to the edge. These stitches intertwine into the Rose stitches of the middle section.

Parallel to this and at a distance of 9 free holes – seen on a horizontal line – between the centers of the Rose stitches of both rows, another Rose stitch row is embroidered along the middle part.

Two further rows of Rose stitches are worked crosswise.

One further Rose stitch row is embroidered next to the existing ones outwards.

The grid is completed with double rows of Rose stitches across the entire shape.

The cross formations of the 4 Rose stitches in the middle are first embroidered in the remaining spaces, then the Cable stitches from the back and the remaining Rose stitches from the front again.

If all remaining spaces of the grid are filled, the following picture is presented:

I don’t think the Cable stitches are prominent enough.

So I worked two rounds of Cable stitches instead of one when filling the tulip motif.

After laundry, the contrast between the flat Rose stitches and the raised Cable stitches is clear.

Filling Pattern – No. 563

category: Limet-Filling pattern
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 20
stitches used: Rose and diagonal Back stitches
center: intersection of withdrawn thread lines (in other shapes or motifs: longitudinal axis = withdrawn thread line)
one pattern segment = 40 threads

After many patterns for small and medium-sized areas, I will now present one for very large areas. A single pattern segment spans 10 squares – that’s 40 threads of fabric!

I came across the pattern years ago when I was visiting an exhibition.

Of course, I immediately tried to find out how it was worked. My pattern is slightly different.

The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.

First, establish a Limet grid with an intersection of withdrawn thread lines as center by alternately cutting 1, leaving 3, vertically and horizontally.

First work one Rose stitch around the center. Then bring the needle up two squares below the center.
Now work 12 Back stitches diagonally across the squares around the Rose stitch. To clarify the run of the stitches, I have created an overview:

From the emerging point two squares below the center point, move 1 square diagonally to the top right, insert and bring the needle up 1 square to the left again. It is important that you catch the working thread that runs along the back. Always take care to keep the holes between the stitches well defined and open. As a result, the pattern appears clear and sharply defined in the end.

Again move the needle over 1 square diagonally to the top right, insert and bring it up again 2 squares to the left and 1 square down.

Move the needle over 1 square diagonally to the bottom right, insert and bring it up again 2 squares diagonally to the top left.

Rotate the work 90° counter-clockwise. From here you repeat the first three Back stitches by moving 1 square diagonally to the top right, insert and bring the needle up 1 square to the left again.

Again move the needle over 1 square diagonally to the top right, insert and bring it up again 2 squares to the left and 1 square down.

Move the needle over 1 square diagonally to the bottom right, insert and bring it up again 2 squares diagonally to the top left.

Again rotate the work 90° counter-clockwise. From here you repeat the first three Back stitches by moving 1 square diagonally to the top right, insert and bring the needle up 1 square to the left again.

Again move the needle over 1 square diagonally to the top right, insert and bring it up again 2 squares to the left and 1 square down.

Move the needle over 1 square diagonally to the bottom right, insert and bring it up again 2 squares diagonally to the top left.

Again rotate the work 90° counter-clockwise. From here you repeat the first three Back stitches by moving 1 square diagonally to the top right, insert and bring the needle up 1 square to the left again.

Again move the needle over 1 square diagonally to the top right, insert and bring it up again 2 squares to the left and 1 square down.

Move the needle over 1 square diagonally to the bottom right, insert and bring it up again 2 squares diagonally to the top left.

The round closes with the twelfth stitch. A criss-cross pattern of stitches has emerged around the Rose stitch. I don’t think this formation is prominent enough. So I repeat the twelve stitches.
From the stitch after the last Back stitch, the needle is moved 1 square to the left. There is the center of the first surrounding Rose stitch.

A total of 12 Rose stitches are worked around the cross.

With the center section complete, it now makes sense to create the Rose stitch grid for the entire pattern.

From the center of the last Rose stitch, move the needle up 1 square up, bring it up and turn the work 90° counter-clockwise. From here work a diagonal row of Rose stitches to the edge. These stitches intertwine into the Rose stitches of the middle section.

Parallel to this and at a distance of 7 free holes – seen on a horizontal line – between the centers of the Rose stitches of both rows, another Rose stitch row is embroidered along the middle part.

Two further rows of Rose stitches are worked crosswise.

One further Rose stitch row is embroidered outwards each existing one.

The grid is completed with double rows of rose stitches across the entire shape.

First, the cross formations with the Rose stitch centers are embroidered in the remaining spaces.

One could leave the Rose stitches surrounding the cross, but I embroidered them for completion.

The positions of the centers of the Rose stitches are shown in the graphic by red dots.

Embroidered it looks like this:

If all remaining spaces of the grid are filled, it looks like this:

One can only divine the contrast between the flat Rose stitches and the raised cross formations.

After laundry, it becomes clearer.

In the original it appears as its small rose flowers embedded in the rose stitch grid.

A Design for Many Different Filling Patterns

Ann Kennon from Australia is a member of the New South Wales Embroiderers’ Guild. She sent me a photo of her recently completed beautiful work. I was given permission to feature her embroidery on my blog because I think you too will be impressed by the choice of all the filling patterns and how they are assigned to the different areas. The distribution of denser and lighter patterns was very balanced and made the project a masterpiece.

She wrote:

“In March last year I ordered and received from you a pre-transferred linen – a “wreath” of leaves. I decided to give myself a challenge and stitch a different filling pattern in each leaf. This, of course, meant that I had to find 38 different patterns. My books provided a number, but the filling patterns on your blog, and in the Roserich book I bought from you, were invaluable, and make up almost half of the patterns I used.”

Can you figure out the patterns posted on my blog?

No traces of the blue outlines can be seen in the photos. Asked how she washed out the colour, Ann replied:

“I did find it difficult to remove the pre-printed design. First, as you had recommended in your blog, and using an appropriate amount of the washing powder you sent, I soaked the embroidery for 2 days, This made no impression on the pre-printing, so I took the fabric out, made up another similar solution with more of the washing powder and soaked the fabric again for another two days, with much the same result.  Having washed that solution out of the fabric, I then put it in a soaking solution using Vanish Napisan, which is an oxygen-based bleach (no chlorine).  After another 2 days the pre-printing was lighter, so I washed the first solution out, made up another and soaked the fabric again. After this there were only a few small patches where the blue was still showing, so I made up the concentrated paste recommended on the container. This was only to stay on the fabric for 5 minutes.  After the 5 minutes there were only small traces of the blue, so I washed the fabric under running water, then soaked it in clean water to ensure that all the bleach was removed. The traces are no longer visible – it all looks white.

It might have been better to put it in the Vanish Napisan from the beginning, but I don’t like using bleach (even the oxygen-based one) if normal washing does the trick.“

I am aware that unfortunately it is difficult to wash out the pre-printed outlines. In the meantime I have used many contacts to find out if there are better options. I learned from French embroiderers who use other powders to print their designs that they also use sodium percarbonate (= the main active ingredient in many household detergents with a bleaching effect, which are advertised with terms such as “active oxygen” or the prefix “Oxi-“) to remove the colour of the lines. They also told me about their experience that washing out becomes more and more time-consuming the older the outlines are.

At the moment I am testing different powder compositions for their durability and washability. I will report the result later.

Filling Patterns for Small Areas

Two of my blog readers recently told me about their search for patterns for small areas. Reason enough to deal with this topic in detail. At first one might think that the selection isn’t very large. But in fact there is a whole range of very different, well-suited patterns.

Typically, the smallest pattern segment – this section of a pattern that always repeats to establish the actual pattern – in all three categories – simple withdrawn thread, Limet, and openwork patterns – spreads over four fabric threads.

Such a segment should be repeated at least three times, preferably five times, in order to achieve an attractive and pleasing pattern.

Here one can work

• Wave stitches
• Satin stitch bars
• Four-Sided stitches
• Four-Sided stitches/wrong side up
• the Square Eyelet pattern Net
Cable stitches and
• Single Faggot stitches
• Cross stitches
• Double Crosses – in straight rows (seen here)
• Double Crosses – in straight rows/wrong side up
• slanting Herringbone stitches and
• slanting Herringbone stitches/wrong side up

As has been shown repeatedly, the pattern segments can be reduced by changing the thread withdrawing and leaving two threads between one withdrawn thread. This again applies to all catogories, simple, Limet and openwork patterns.

In pictures 9 and 10 of Sofa Cushion Cover 1(B) you can see the Wave stitch in the reduced grid and compare in picture 7 with the Wave stitch in the usual grid. Pictures 12 and 13 of this article show the Cable stitch in the reduced openwork thread grid. In pictures 13 and 16 is the
Single Faggot stitch seen in both reduced and standard thread grids.

Also in the patterns of the poppy flower you can see the difference between reduced and usual thread withdrawing.

Another comparison can be found in this article on pictures 8 and 9.

If you have a little more space, you can work patterns with a segment of 8 threads (or 6 threads in the reduced thread grid). These patterns can also be described as small patterns. In these thread grids you can work

• Honey Comb Darning stitches ,
• different Satin stitch patterns
Rose stitches and the Rose stitch variant (seen here – pictures 3,4 and 5)
• different Square Eyelet patterns
• Diagonal Cross Filling
• Double Diagonal Cross Filling stitches
• Diagonal Cross Filling – French variation (seen here)
• Diagonal Cross Filling – French variation/wrong side up
• Diagonal Cross Filling – French variation/“half“(seen here)
• Diagonal Cross Filling – French variation/“half“/wrong side up
• Diagonal Cross Filling – French variation/“vertical half“ Double Back stitches
• Double Back stitches/wrong side up
Easy Eyelet stitches
• Easy Eyelet stitches/wrong side up (seen here pictures 11 and 12)
• Filling Pattern No. 555
• Filling Pattern No. 549
• Filling Pattern No. 479
• Filling Pattern No. 560

and certainly many more.

As you can see, the choice of patterns for small areas is huge!

Here are a few impressions of differently embroidered small areas.