Preview of the 2021 Exhibition

Preview of the 2021 Exhibition

The work is finished – all ten exhibition rooms are prepared! The decorator Brigitte Siefken did a great job, putting the finishing touches on the arrangement and making the presentation a feast for the eyes.

I haven’t yet counted all the pieces, but I estimate there are now well over 400 exhibits. Interested viewers will be excited to learn that many of the embroideries have never been seen before by the general public!

Open
from August 16 to September 30, 2021
in a time slot from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
pre-arranged time slots between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m.
only to those persons who have been fully vaccinated, recovered, or newly PCR-tested (vaccination card or covid test results card required).
Entrance fee: € 5.00

Please note that the rooms are not barrier-free and can only be reached via many steps.

Here are some pictures to whet your appetite!

Exhibition – Open for a Short Time Only

Exhibition – Open for a Short Time Only

You may have been surprised that no new blog posts have been posted in recent weeks. I used the time to clean and realign my exhibition rooms, which have been lying fallow for almost two years.
My complete vaccination and some requests to visit have led me to ready the many exhibits for viewing before autumn comes.

Of course, the Global Schwalm Sampler occupies a special place. But also a number of other outstanding embroideries were additionally integrated into the exhibition.

Furthermore, selected comparisons of traditional pieces and their contemporary interpretations can be seen.

For the interested viewer, Parade Cushions – Pillow Parade includes many handed down and new embroideries: ring pillows, sachets, pincushions, chair cushions, sofa cushions, neck pillows, so called “Peel” pillows (sacks) and Parade cushions – cushions in all sizes and various designs.

Lately I have sewn, filled, transported and decorated a lot. I’m not quite done yet, but I hope to make it in time.

Stars Shine and Angels Dance expands the Christmas section of the exhibition.

Designs by various designers on the subject of pomegranates and birds will also interest the serious embroiderer.

Let yourself be surprised!

The exhibition will run from 16 August to the end of September. Due to the pandemic, the exhibition will be open by appointment only to those who have been fully vaccinated, recovered, or newly PCR-tested and wearing masks. I invite individuals or small groups to make their appointment by emailing me.

Please note that the rooms are not barrier-free and can only be reached via many steps.

Filling Pattern – No. 558

Filling Pattern – No. 558

category: openwork filling pattern with Cable stitch grid
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 30 for the Cable stitches and No. 20 for the Needle-weaving and the Rose stitches
stitches used: Needle-weaving and Rose stitches
center: intersection of withdrawn thread lines (square)
one pattern segment: 24 threads

The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.

First, establish an openwork grid with a square (an intersection of withdrawn thread lines) in the center by cutting 2, leaving 2 both vertically and horizontally.

Stabilize the established grid with Single Faggot stitches worked from the back side of the fabric. Please remember that Single Faggot stitch worked on the back side will look like Cable stitch viewed from the front.

Work Needle-weaving stitches over one square

along the horizontal center axis.

Work parallel rows of Needle-weaving stitches with four empty squares between

until the entire shape is filled.

Work Rose stitches starting in the fourth square below the center square at the vertical center axis.

Starting with four stitches diagonally left and upward, work them in a zigzag manner between the two rows of solid Needle-weaving stitches.

Continue with three stitches diagonally downward to the left.

Work the stitches in the next open area mirrored to those of the previously worked areas.

When the entire shape is filled, a nice pattern is established.

Two variations are to use only Rose stitches or only Needle-weaving stitches. This would change the appearance a little bit.

I discovered this pattern on a pillowcase from about 1860.

It is also possible to adjust the zigzag lines so that they are not mirrored.

In traditional Schwalm whitework, this pattern, and its several variations, was popular for filling basket motifs.

Embroideries by Rosemarie Landsiedel-Eicken (4)

Embroideries by Rosemarie Landsiedel-Eicken (4)

After Peahole and needle-weaving hems, the goal of the fourth project was to learn needlelace edgings. While many embroiderers only work needlelace scallops as their first needlelace edging project, Rosemarie Landsiedel-Eicken included three levels of difficulty in her edge: pyramids inside scallops with picots.

In comparison to tea cloth 1 and tea cloth 2, the motifs of this doily are more elaborate and bold.

Filling Pattern – No. 557

Filling Pattern – No. 557

category: openwork filling pattern with Cable stitch grid
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 30 for the Cable stitches and No. 20 for the Needle-weaving and the Rose stitches
stitches used: Needle-weaving and Rose stitches
center: intersection of pairs of fabric threads
one pattern segment: 20 threads

The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.

First, establish an openwork grid with an intersection of pairs of threads in the center by cutting 2, leaving 2 both vertically and horizontally.

Stabilize the established grid with Single Faggot stitches worked from the back side of the fabric. Please remember that Single Faggot stitch worked on the back side will look like Cable stitch viewed from the front.

It is best to start by working with the Rose stitches. This makes traveling from one pattern area to the next easier.

So, work a square of 2 X 2 Rose stitches around the center intersection – best to start on the bottom right,

continuing top right,

bottom left,

and top left.

From there you move on to the next pattern area – a square of 2 X 2 Rose stitches above the first and with a distance of three empty squares between. Traveling is done by wrapping around the bundled fabric threads. So that they are nearly invisible, the wrapping stitches should run in the same direction as the Cable stitches. So, keeping this in mind, after completing the square of Rose stitches, bring the needle up either in the top right square or in the top left square to wrap once around the bundled fabric threads each square

to bring the needle up the fourth square on the top right to start the next square of 2 X 2 Rose stitches in the established way.

Work a next row of 2 X 2 Rose stitch squares with a distance of three empty squares between beside.

Continue working in the same way, until the entire shape is filled.

Now work Needle-weaving stitches over four squares in a stair-step manner between.

Of course, change the direction of the stitches with each step.

Work continuing rows always mirrored to the previous ones

until the entire shape is filled.

After boiling the clusters of Rose stitches lose their shine.

Two variations are to use only Rose stitches or only Needle-weaving stitches. This would change the appearance a little bit.

I discovered this pattern on an elaborate tea cloth while visiting an exhibition of contemporary Schwalm whitework in 2019.

At the time this pattern caught my eye because of the nice contrast between the matte appearance of the Rose stitches and the shiny appearance of the Needle-weaving stitches.