Filling Pattern – No. 568

category: simple drawn thread filling pattern
linen used: 13.5/cm thread-count
threads used: coton à broder No. 20
stitches used: Four-Sided stitches
horizontal center axis: four thread column

While working Filling Pattern – No. 567 I also found the pattern emerging on the back very interesting. So I tested it as a front pattern. The pattern shown below is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.

Because it’s the same pattern reversed, the prep work is the same. For the sake of simplicity I show it here again.
It makes sense to start in the middle. In addition to the 4 threads that remain, a pair of threads is withdrawn on each side.

Four threads are now alternately left on both sides of the withdrawn thread line and another pair of threads is withdrawn.

Rotate the work 90°, but do not turn it to the back side this time.
Four-Sided stitches are embroidered over the four middle threads from left to right, each bundling 4 fabric threads.

The Four-Sided stitches of the adjacent rows are worked staggered by 2 fabric threads.

This gives the remaining fabric threads of the withdrawn thread lines a zigzag alignment.

Securing the thread ends is done either under the edge stitches or in the back under the Four-Sided stitches.

The pattern is suitable for medium-sized areas.

I embroidered it in a tulip (here 16/cm thread count linen and No. 25 coton à broder).

I find the combination with the Wave stitch appropriate, as can be seen here in the tip of the tulip.

Variations can be achieved by using finer thread or – as here – by withdrawing one or two more threads.

Filling Pattern – No. 567

category: simple drawn thread filling pattern
linen used: 13.5/cm thread-count
threads used: coton à broder No. 20
stitches used: Four-Sided stitches
vertical center axis: four thread column

The pattern shown below is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.

It makes sense to start in the middle. In addition to the 4 threads that remain, a pair of threads is withdrawn on each side.

Four threads are now alternately left on both sides of the withdrawn thread line and another pair of threads is withdrawn.

Rotate the work 90° and turn it to the back side.
Four-Sided stitches are embroidered over the four middle threads from the back and from left to right, each bundling 4 fabric threads.

The Four-Sided stitches of the adjacent rows are worked staggered by 2 fabric threads.

This gives the remaining fabric threads of the withdrawn thread lines a zigzag alignment.

From the front, it looks like this:

Securing the thread ends is done either under the edge stitches or under the crosses of the Four-Sided stitches.

The pattern is suitable for medium-sized areas.

I found this pattern in a border of a parade cushion from 1821. Here it fills the basket motif in combination with Satin stitch bars.

I embroidered it in a tulip (here 16/cm thread-count linen and coton à broder No. 25 ).

I find the combination with the pattern that is created when you embroider the Wave stitch from the back appropriate, as can be seen here in the tulip point.

Modifications can be achieved by using finer thread – like here No. 25 on 13.5/cm thread-count linen – or by withdrawing one or two more threads.

Filling Pattern – No. 566

category: openwork filling pattern with Cable stitch grid
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 30 for the Cable stitches and No. 20 for the Needle-weaving and the Rose stitches
stitches used: Cable and Rose stitches
center: intersection of pairs of fabric threads
one pattern segment: = 28 threads

While embroidering from No. 565, I came up with the idea of modifying the pattern with additional Needle-weaving stitches. This makes the workflow a little more fluid.

The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only.

First, establish an openwork grid with an intersection of pairs of threads in the center by cutting 2, leaving 2 both vertically and horizontally.

Stabilize the established grid with Single Faggot stitches worked from the back side of the fabric. Please remember that Single Faggot stitch worked on the back side will look like Cable stitch viewed from the front.

Then the first part of the desired pattern – made up from Rose stitches in squares of 4 x 4 stitches and always 3 Rose stitches in a diagonal row in between – is embroidered into the Cable stitch grid.

Therefore bring the needle up in the second square diagonally from the center

and embroiders a square of 4 x 4 Rose stitches around the center square of 2 x 2 remaining free squares.
From one corner of the resulting square, embroider 3 diagonal Rose stitches.
The fourth Rose stitch on this diagonal row is the corner point of the next square of 4 x 4 Rose stitches.
Slide the working thread on the back through existing stitches to the next emerging point

and gradually build up the pattern.

The second part of the pattern is embroidered in a distance of one remaining free square to the first part. It consists of Needle-weaving stitches over 4 squares in width and one square in in height, worked in a stair-step manner and with single Rose stitches in between.

The constant alternation between the two parts creates a pattern

that is effective through the contrast between smoother-looking Needle-weaving stitches and rougher-looking rose stitches.

Filling Pattern – No. 565

category: openwork filling pattern with Cable stitch grid
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 30 for the Cable stitches and No. 20 for the Rose stitches
stitches used: Cable and Rose stitches
center: intersection of pairs of fabric threads
one pattern segment: = 28 threads

The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.

First, establish an openwork grid with an intersection of pairs of threads in the center by cutting 2, leaving 2 both vertically and horizontally.

Stabilize the established grid with Single Faggot stitches worked from the back side of the fabric. Please remember that Single Faggot stitch worked on the back side will look likeCable stitch viewed from the front.

Then the desired pattern – made up of Rose stitches in squares of 4 x 4 stitches and “five-cubes” – is embroidered into the grid.

Bring needle up in the second square diagonally from the center

and embroiders a square of 4 x 4 Rose stitches around the center square of 2 x 2 remaining free squares.

From one corner of the resulting square, embroider 3 diagonal Rose stitches.

The fourth Rose stitch on this diagonal row is the corner point of the next square of 4 x 4 Rose stitches.
Slide the working thread on the back through existing stitches to the next emerging point

and gradually build up the pattern.

This pattern also looks very nice when it is placed diagonally in a motif area, as is the case here.

Filling Pattern – No. 564

A word on my own behalf:
As you will surely have noticed, I have lost my English editor. Thank you Joey for years of professional support and great cooperation. Now I have to manage on my own. Nevertheless, I really hope that my texts are somewhat understandable.

Filling Pattern – No. 564

category: Limet-Filling pattern
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 20
stitches used: Rose and Cable stitches
center: intersection of withdrawn thread lines (in other shapes or motifs: longitudinal axis = withdrawn thread line)
one pattern segment = 48 threads

In Schwalm whitework, it is common to embroider opposite or diagonally opposite motifs with the same filling pattern. However, experienced embroiderers, who have a very large treasure trove of patterns at their disposal, also like to use different but similar filling patterns.

The two following photos show two opposite corners of a tablecloth. One main tulip was decorated with Filling Pattern No. 563,

the opposite one with filling pattern No. 564 shown in the following. This pattern is similar, but with a segment width of 48 fabric threads a little more spacious.

Further examples for the different arrangement of the same or similar filling patterns can be found here:
Variety of Schwalm Whitework
Pretty Contemporary Schwalm Table Cloth
A Framed Schwalm Sampler (images 3 and 4)
Transition from Early to Later Schwalm Whitework (1) (image 1)
Early Schwalm Whitework – A Gorgeous Table Runner (image 1)
Traditional Schwalm Bodice (B) (image 1)

But now to the pattern itself.
The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.
First, establish a Limet grid with an intersection of withdrawn thread lines as center by alternately cutting 1, leaving 3, vertically and horizontally.

Bring needle up 1 square above the center and work a Rose stitch from there. Three more Rose stitches, each equally spaced, are worked around the center point.

After completing the fourth Rose stitch, the needle remains on the back.

The work is turned. From the last Rose stitch, cross 1 square to the right, insert

and rotate the work 45° clockwise.

The next stitches are embroidered from the back.
Now work 20 Cable stitches around the Rose stitches – five on each side. To do this, you cross 1 square diagonally to the left and bring needle up.

From the emerging point, move the needle diagonally to the top right, insert in the next hole and bring it up in the next one to the left. It is important that you also catch the working thread that runs from one stitch to the next. Always take care to keep the holes between the stitches well defined and open. As a result, the pattern appears clear and sharply defined in the end.

From the emerging point, move the needle diagonally to the bottom right, insert in the next hole and bring it up in the next one to the left.

From the emerging point, move the needle diagonally to the top right, insert in the next hole and bring it up in the next one to the left.

From the emerging point, move the needle diagonally to the bottom right, insert in the next hole and bring it up in the next one to the left.

The 5 Cable stitches of the first side are finished. The three remaining sides are processed in a similar way. However, since you have to insert directly at the last emerging point, the working thread must be passed under the existing stitches (the thread that runs from the penultimate to the last Cable stitch and a leg of a Rose stitch) so that the holes remain open.

You can then return to the last emerging point and embroider 5 Cable stitches from there in the established way. It makes sense to turn the work so that you can move the needle always horizontally from right to left.

After completing the twentieth Cable stitch, the round is closed. From the emerging point, move the needle diagonally down to the right, insert the next hole there,

turn the work and continue embroidering on the front side again. The current emeriging point is the center of the first Rose stitch

A total of 16 Rose stitches are worked around the Cable stitch rhombus.

With the center section complete, it now makes sense to create the Rose stitch grid for the entire pattern.
From the center of the last Rose stitch, move the needle 1 square to the left, bring it up and from here work a diagonal row of Rose stitches to the edge. These stitches intertwine into the Rose stitches of the middle section.

Parallel to this and at a distance of 9 free holes – seen on a horizontal line – between the centers of the Rose stitches of both rows, another Rose stitch row is embroidered along the middle part.

Two further rows of Rose stitches are worked crosswise.

One further Rose stitch row is embroidered next to the existing ones outwards.

The grid is completed with double rows of Rose stitches across the entire shape.

The cross formations of the 4 Rose stitches in the middle are first embroidered in the remaining spaces, then the Cable stitches from the back and the remaining Rose stitches from the front again.

If all remaining spaces of the grid are filled, the following picture is presented:

I don’t think the Cable stitches are prominent enough.

So I worked two rounds of Cable stitches instead of one when filling the tulip motif.

After laundry, the contrast between the flat Rose stitches and the raised Cable stitches is clear.