Filling Pattern – No. 555

Filling Pattern – No. 555

category: Limet-Filling pattern
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 20
stitches used: Diagonal Four-Sided stitches
center: intersection of withdrawn thread lines (in other shapes or motifs: longitudinal axis = withdrawn thread line)
one pattern segment = 8 threads

While embroidering the filling pattern No. 554, I got the idea to create a pattern using diagonal Four-Sided stitches only – one more pattern for smaller shapes.

The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.

First, establish a Limet grid with an intersection of withdrawn thread lines at the center by alternately cutting 1, leaving 3, vertically and horizontally.

Mark the center point. Bring the needle up in the next hole left of the center. From there start to work a Four-Sided stitch in a diagonal row – as a rhombus around the center point.

Therefore, *travel one square diagonally right up, insert the needle and bring it up again two squares downward.

Travel one square diagonally right up, insert the needle and bring it up again two squares to the left.

Travel one square diagonally right down, insert the needle and bring it up again two squares upward.

Travel one square diagonally right down and insert the needle.

In this way and always tightening the working thread, a prominent stitch sequence is established.

This time it is not necessary to work the Four-Sided stitch twice. By working these stitches side by side to the next, in the end all four sides of the stitch will be doubled.

So, after the fourth stitch, insert the needle and bring it up one square up and three squares to the left to work from there the next diagonal Four-Sided stitch in the established way.

So that the holes keep well defined and open, please make sure to catch all the working threads on the back with the stitches.

Work diagonal Four-Sided stitches up to the end of the row.

Try to always keep the same tension to establish an even structure throughout the entire pattern.

Turn the piece and then work a next row of diagonal Four-Sided stitches beside.

Work row beside row until the entire shape is filled. Make sure that you always turn the work so that the rows are oriented from bottom right to top left.

Once the entire shape is filled, a pattern is created which, viewing from the top, looks similar to other patterns with same sized segments.

But the side view shows another structure.

After boiling and ironing the pattern develops its full charm.

Filling Pattern – No. 553

Filling Pattern – No. 553

category: Limet-Filling pattern
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 20 for the Rose and No. 16 for the Four-Sided stitches
stitches used: Rose and Four-Sided stitches
center: intersection of withdrawn thread lines (in other shapes or motifs: longitudinal axis = withdrawn thread line)
one pattern segment = 24 threads

The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape at the end of this article.

First, establish a Limet grid with an intersection of withdrawn thread lines as center by alternately cutting 1, leaving 3, vertically and horizontally.

Mark around the center point a square of 2 X 2 squares. Bring the needle up in the next hole left of the bottom left corner. This is the center of the first Rose stitch.

Work Rose stitches in a diagonal row.

Work a second row of Rose stitches parallel to the first and at a distance of 2 empty holes (counted in a diagonal line from one Rose stitch center of the first row to a Rose stitch center of the second row).

Do the same in the crossing direction.

Up from there lay a grid of Rose stitch rows across the entire shape in the established way. Each area of the grid has a remaining section of 2 X 2 squares around the respective center hole, which now should be covered with Four-Sided stitches.

Because the working thread has to be slid under previously worked stitches to travel from one stitch to the next, it is easier to work the stitches from the back.

Secure the working thread very well and bring it up at an intersection of two Rose stitch rows.
It is important to choose the opposite side for starting the Four-Sided stitch to get the corner holes clean and open and the stitch centered.

*Start on the top of the center square, inserting the needle in the top right hole and bringing it up in the top left hole.

Travel to the bottom, insert the needle in the bottom right hole and bring it up in the bottom left hole. With this stitch the thread can be tightened a little bit more to pull together the threads of the center square.

Insert the needle in the top right hole again, but bring it up in the bottom right hole.

Insert the needle in the top left hole and bring it up in the bottom left hole.* In this way and always tightening the working thread, a prominent center is established on the front.

But this stitch will turn out much more prominent, working the Four-Sided stitch twice. This also enables one to better tighten the working thread and so to establish a more even structure of the complete pattern. So repeat the four steps (*) once.

Then, traveling straight up to the next center square, slide the working thread through the cross that has been made with the Four-Sided stitches and then through the stitches of the right three-thread column.

Work one Four-Sided stitch two times in the established way in each section center of the Rose stitch grid.

I discovered this stitch in the contribution of Ekaterina Khokhlova to the Global Schwalm Sampler.

Filling Pattern – No. 547

category: openwork filling pattern with Cable stitch grid
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 30 for the Cable stitches and No. 20 for the Rose stitches
stitches used: Rose stitches
center: intersection of pairs of threads
one pattern segment: 28 threads

First, establish an openwork grid with an intersection of pairs of threads in the center by cutting 2, leaving 2 both vertically and horizontally.

Stabilize the established grid with Single Faggot stitches worked from the back side of the fabric. Please remember that Single Faggot stitch worked on the back side will look like Cable stitch viewed from the front.

Work a square of 2 X 2 Rose stitches around the center intersection – counterclockwise and starting on the bottom right. After completing the square of Rose stitches, bring the needle up in the square diagonal to the lower left corner.

From there work a diagonal row of Rose stitches upward to the left.

Turn the piece and work a second diagonal row parallel and with a distance of five empty squares between – counted in a straight line.

Complete the first row, and work rows of Rose stitches perpendicular to the first and running directly along the corners of the center square.

Crossing previously worked rows, slide the working thread on the back through the already established stitches.

Work a second row beside and outward to the first.

Do the same to all four rows.

*Work two single rows with a distance of five empty squares between (counted in a straight line) to the right and to the left of one pair of the established rows.

Please note: my sampler square will get an edge border of Satin stitches. Of course, this edge border should normally be worked first – before withdrawing the threads. In this way, the edge border can be worked much more easily, and the working threads of the Single Faggot stitches can be secured there. I was pressed for time when working the steps in preparation to share them with you, and in my haste I skipped this important step. The picture at the end of this article shows the sample with the border. It was very difficult to get the stitches to look nice and orderly! So, please do not follow my example, but take the time to stitch an edge border first.

Start working a single row perpendicular to the just worked row, but this time include working squares of 2 X 2 Rose stitches into the established rhombus sections. Therefore bring the needle up in the square diagonal to the top left

and work a square of 2 X 2 Rose stitches.

On the way back to the Rose stitch row, slide the working thread through the already established stitches.

Continue working the Rose stitch row including a square of 2 X 2 Rose stitches in every second rhombus section.

Do the same on the opposite side.

Work a second row of Rose stitches beside and outward to each of the four rows.*

Continue working the same steps (*)

until the entire shape is filled.

This pattern is especially charming in wider motifs. This motif was embroidered by Sylvia Sellmaier. Thanks to her for allowing to show her work.

Filling Pattern No. 542

category: openwork filling pattern with Cable stitch grid
stitches used: Rose stitches
center: axis of intersections of pairs of threads; in other shapes – center: intersection of pairs of threads
As promised, here is the explanation for the counterpart of filling pattern 541.
Starting where the diagonal center axis crosses the perpendicular axis at the bottom point of the shape, leave two threads, and then commence making the grid by always alternating between withdrawing and leaving two vertical threads. Do the same with the horizontal threads.


The established grid is stabilized with Single Faggot stitches – which is simply Cable stitch when worked on the front – worked on the back side of the fabric.


Work a row of Rose stitches into the holes along the diagonal center axis.


Looking at the outside corners of the Rose stitch squares, leave 1 hole unworked, and continue working Rose stitch rows to both sides until the entire shape is filled.


Starting approximately in the middle, work perpendicular rows of Rose stitches to form rhombi of 2 X 2 Rose stitches


until the entire shape is filled.


In the image below, the piece has not been boiled. After shrinking during the boiling process, the pattern will get a nice appearance.


Coton à broder No. 30 was used for the Cable stitches and No. 20 for the Rose stitches. The linen has a 16/cm thread count.

Filling Pattern No. 541

category: openwork filling pattern without Cable stitch grid
stitches used: sections of Rose stitches and Four-Sided stitches
center: intersection of pairs of threads

As mentioned in my blog post Traditional Schwalm Whitework, I will now explain how to work a special pattern consisting of sections of Rose stitches and Four-Sided stitches in an openwork grid without Cable stitches. I first noticed such a pattern on a piece from 1804.

Starting at the center leave the two center threads, and then commence making the grid by always alternating between withdrawing and leaving two vertical threads. Do the same with the horizontal threads.

Bring the needle up in the hole at the bottom left of the center intersection (marked red).


Lay the thread in a loop to the top and left, insert the needle in the next hole to the left and bring it up again in the first hole. Pull the thread through.


*Cross over the working thread and under the upper pair of fabric threads, and bring the needle up in the next hole upward.


Again lay the thread in a loop to the top and left, insert the needle in the next hole to the left, and bring it up again in the previously used hole. Pull the thread through. The working thread is beneath the needle.


Lay a loop to the top right, insert the needle in the next hole upward, and bring it up again in the previously used hole.


Pull the thread through and turn the piece 90° counterclockwise*. Repeat the steps (*) until a square of 2 X 2 holes is filled with two sections of a Rose stitch each. The last stitch is worked in the bottom left hole of the square. From the last stitch, cross over the working thread


and insert the needle into the same hole.


On the back, slide the working thread under the former middle top stitch.


Looking at the next intersection above, bring the needle up in the top left hole to begin a Four-Sided stitch.


Cross over the pair of threads to the right, insert the needle, and bring it up diagonally in the bottom left hole.


Cross over the pair of threads to the right, insert the needle, and bring it up diagonally in the upper left hole.


Cross over the pair of threads downward, insert the needle, and bring it up diagonally in the upper right hole.


Cross over the pair of threads downward, insert the needle, and bring it up two holes up and one hole to the left. Start here with the next square of 2 X 2 holes to be filled with two sections of a Rose stitch each.


Work rows of alternating 2 X 2 squares and Four-Sided stitches.


Work the next row staggered.


Repeat the steps until the entire shape is filled.


For my first attempt, I used coton à broder No. 25, but it was too fine to fill the holes thoroughly. So, in the end I used coton à broder No. 16.


In the image above, the piece has not been boiled. After shrinking during the boiling process, the pattern will get a nice appearance with flat areas for the Rose-stitch-section squares and more prominent areas where the Four-Sided stitches are.


I will explain the counterpart – worked with the common pattern of Rose stitch squares in a Cable stitch grid – in a future article.