Filling Pattern – No. 562

category: simple drawn thread filling pattern
linen used: 13.5/cm thread-count
threads used: coton à broder No. 20
stitches used: Wrap stitches
horizontal center axis: quadruple withdrawn thread line

The flower motif with the openwork leaves is found on the Schwalm Parade Cushion Border (B).

As you can see from the detail of the original embroidery, it is a kind of staggered pea holes, which do not have Four-Sided stitches as a basis, but consist exclusively of wrap stitches.

I have tried different ways and recommend embroidering the pattern as described below.

Alternate withdrawing 4 fabric threads in one direction and leaving 2 in between. The pattern builds up from the bottom right to the top left.

To do this, wrap around 6 fabric threads of the lowest wide withdrawn thread line 3-4 times.

*Then slide the needle diagonally to the top left under the horizontal pair of fabric threads to the next withdrawn thread line and bring it up between the third and fourth thread of the bundle.

Repeat the stitch once,

return to the starting point and slide the needle under the wrapped bundle of threads to the opposite side.

From there, the needle is led diagonally to the top right crossing over the horizontal pair of threads, inserted again between the third and fourth thread of the bundle and emerges again at the starting point.

Once again, the needle is led diagonally to the top right crossing over the horizontal pair of threads, inserted again between the third and fourth threads of the bundle. This time bring the needle up 6 fabric threads to the left.

The 6 fabric threads lying on the needle form the next bundle. But before you can wrap it, you have to connect the left 3 threads to the underlying pair of threads.
To do this, the needle is led diagonally over the pair of threads to the bottom right, inserted next to the wrapped bundle and brought up again at the starting point.

This stitch is also repeated once,

to then wrap the two bundles of 3 threads together.*

Repeat the steps of working(*).

Reaching the top edge, turn the work 180° and embroider the next row next to the first.

In the places where the thread pairs are already wrapped, these steps can be omitted.
Some rows – not all – move close to the previous one. You can move the bundles slightly with the needle tip to achieve even distances.

In this way, an airy pattern is created that is suitable for filling not too large areas.

Filling Pattern – No. 561

category: simple drawn thread filling pattern
linen used: 13.5/cm thread-count
threads used: coton à broder No. 20 for the Four-Sided and No. 16 for the Peaholes
stitches used: Four-Sided stitches and a variation of wrapped Peaholes
horizontal center axis: double withdrawn thread line

The pomegranate motifs come from the Schwalm parade cushion border (B).

As you can see from the two pictures with the original embroidery, the pattern has been worked slightly differently.

Actually it is a variation of the wrapped Peahole,
which can be seen here from the front

and back.

Erbslochkante_7

The main difference is the use of thicker thread and additional wrapping of the ends of adjacent bundles of threads.
From this I derived a variation that does not fully correspond to the original, but comes very close.

The pattern shown below is a practice exercise only.

It makes sense to start thread withdrawing in the middle. Here I first have withdrawn the middle pair of threads and then removed 5 more fabric threads on each side, so a total of 12 threads.

Four threads are now alternately left on both sides of the withdrawn thread line and another is withdrawn.

Four-Sided stitches (coton à broder No. 20) are embroidered from the back over the four remaining threads, each bundling 4 fabric threads.

Using coton à broder No. 16 the resulting bundles of threads are wrapped and joined together into Peaholes.

Start with the right bundle of threads and wrap – from bottom to top – around it 12-14 times. The wrapping thread should lie evenly next to each other and should be the same in number across all thread bundles.

*The thread is slide under the crosses of the Four-Sided stitches to the next bundle of threads.

Now wrap from top to bottom. First, the unprocessed bundle and the one to the right of it are joined together by two wrappings.

Then continue to wrap the left bundle of threads until you reach the bottom edge.

There the two thread bundles are pulled together again by two wrappings

and the thread is slide under the crosses of the Four-Sided stitches to the next bundle of threads.

Again wrap from bottom to top, but this time only up to the middle. There, the partially unprocessed bundle of threads and the bundle of threads to the right of it are tightly pulled together with two wrappings.

Then the left thread bundle is wrapped until reaching the upper edge.*

The steps (*) are repeated, on the way down the bundles of threads are joined together at the edges

and on the way up in the middle.

From the front, it looks like this:

Then the remaining area is filled with Four-Sided stitches.

A pretty pattern – particularly suitable for long, narrow motifs – is established.

I have noticed that the variant of the peaholes, which are also wrapped together at the edges, makes working the folded peahole edging much easier.

Filling Pattern – No. 479

No. 479
category: simple drawn thread filling pattern
stitches used: bars of Satin stitches over 2 threads in the width and 2 threads in the height
vertical axis: withdrawn thread line
materials used: 13.5/cm thread-count Weddigen linen Coton à broder No. 20 for the filling pattern

Figuring out filling pattern 478, I conceived the idea of filling a shape only with Satin stitches over 2 threads in the width and 2 threads in the height and working them alternating slanting up to the right and then to the left The result is a nice pattern for narrow shapes on the straight of grain.
479_1Starting in the middle, alternate withdrawing 1 vertical thread and leaving 2 vertical threads.
479_2
479_3In vertical columns, from bottom to top and back, embroider Satin stitches as “bars.” Start at the bottom right of the longitudinal axis and work Satin stitches. They are worked slanting and crossing 2 fabric threads in the height and width.
479_4Also, the stitches are worked alternating slanting up to the right and then to the left. So, after working the last stitch of the first bar, do no turn the work but bring the needle up at the left of the next two-thread column (to the left of the column just worked)
479_5and work slanting Satin stitches from top to bottom.
479_6Continue working Satin stitch bars always alternating from bottom to top and back without turning the piece
479_7until the half of the shape is filled.
479_8Now turn the piece and working from the already embroidered section, fill the remaining section.
Start there with a bar worked from top to bottom and continue working in the established way
479_9until the entire shape is filled.
479_10Washed, starched, and ironed the finished pattern shows its full charm.

Filling Pattern – No. 478

No. 478
category: simple drawn thread filling pattern
stitches used: Four blocks of 8 Satin stitches over 2 threads in the width and 2 threads in the height and Rose stitches
vertical axis: withdrawn thread line
materials used: 13.5/cm thread-count Weddigen linen Coton à broder No. 20 for the filling pattern

As already mentioned in the previous article “The Filling Patterns of the Traditional Schwalm Bodice A” I here present the filling pattern of shape 1.
Because it is easier to understand how to work this pattern without a shape, I first show it as a practice exercise.
478_1Alternate withdrawing 1 vertical thread and leaving 2 vertical threads.
478_2In vertical columns, from bottom to top and back, embroider Satin stitches as “bars.” The Satin stitches are worked slanting and crossing 2 fabric threads in the height and width. A Satin stitch bar is made with 8 stitches in all.
478_3Also, the stitches are worked alternating slanting up to the right and then to the left. So, after working the last stitch of the first bar, do not turn the work but bring the needle up at the left of the next two-thread column (to the left of the column just worked)
478_4and work 8 slanting Satin stitches from top to bottom.
478_5Work 4 Satin stitch bars in all, alternating from bottom to top and back without turning the piece.

After the last Satin stitch, bring the needle up at the left of the next two-thread column (to the left of the column just worked) – 4 fabric threads up from the bottom.
478_6Work a Rose stitch with the first step worked over 2 fabric threads to the left,
478_7the second step is worked over 4 fabric threads at the top,
478_8the third step is worked over 2 fabric threads to the right, and
478_9the fourth step is worked over 4 fabric threads at the bottom.
478_10Take the needle over the last step’s stitch, insert it in the center hole and bring it up 2 fabric threads to the left and 4 fabric threads up from the center.
478_11Again work a second and
478_12a third Rose stitch in the established way. You should create “a die with 5 pips.” So bring the needle up 4 fabric threads to the right of the last Rose stitch center. Moving straight to the right will make the working thread in the back visible (please see red arrow).
478_13To avoid this and to keep the holes open and clean, slide the working thread along a curved path through the stitches on the back.
Work 1 Rose stitch at the top right and 1 Rose stitch at the bottom left (please carefully look to the picture).
478_14To start the next Satin stitch block, bring the needle up 4 fabric threads down and 4 fabric threads to the left of the last Rose stitch center.

In this established way work always alternating four blocks of Satin stitches and “dies with 5 pips” of Rose stitches.
478_15Work the “dies” staggered in the next row.
Because the pattern has a tall narrow effect, I looked for a matching shape and decided on a bell.
478_16Starting in the middle, alternate withdrawing 1 vertical thread and leaving 2 vertical threads.
478_17In vertical columns, from bottom to top and back, embroider Satin stitches as “bars.” Start at the bottom left of the longitudinal axis (red marked line) and work – in the established way – always alternating four blocks of Satin stitches and
478_185 Rose stitches.
478_19Work the next row staggered.
478_20Finish the first row up from the already worked section.
478_21Work the rows like a checkerboard all over the shape.
478_22Washed, starched, and ironed the finished pattern shows its final charm.

Filling Pattern – No. 446

No. 446
category: simple drawn thread filling pattern
stitches used: Satin stitches over 3 threads in the width and Honeycomb Darning stitches
vertical axis: withdrawn thread line
materials used: 13.5/cm thread-count Weddigen linen
Coton à broder No. 20 (Coral Knot stitches, Satin stitches and Honeycomb Darning stitches), No.
25 (Blanket stitches) and No. 30 (Chain stitches)

Fadenauszug | thread withdrawing

Starting in the middle, alternate withdrawing 1 vertical thread and leaving 3 vertical threads.
In vertical columns, from bottom to top and back, embroider Satin stitches as “bars”. From the center, leave unworked the 2 centermost groups of 3 vertical threads. Stitch a Satin stitch bar over the next 3 threads, *leave 2 groups of 3 unworked, then work another Satin stitch bar*. Always repeat the steps (*), until one half of the shape is filled.

Wickelstichstangen | Satin stitch bars

Again starting in the middle, fill the second half mirrored.

Waffelstiche | Honeycomb Darning stitches

The right of the two remaining groups of 3 vertical threads are now embroidered, from bottom to top, with Honeycomb Darning stitches over 4 threads in the width (when the heart is turned 90°).
Finally, the remaining group of 3 vertical threads is embroidered from top to bottom mirrored to the first.

Waffelstiche vergrößert | Honeycomd Darning stitches enlarged

The enlarged image shows how the Honeycomb Darning stitch is worked. However, more detailed instructions can be found in my book “Basic Principles of Schwalm Whitework”.

fertiges Muster ungewaschen | finisched pattern before laundry

The finished pattern – here unwashed – has a three-dimensional effect.

gewaschen gestaerkt gebuegelt | washed starched and ironed

Washed, starched and ironed the finished pattern shows its full charm.