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The Folded Peahole Edging

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I have seen the folded Peahole edging (also called mouse tooth edging) on many different pieces, but I have never worked it myself before now. I took a practice piece of linen and tried to replicate it. I was absolutely displeased with the result.

After several attempts I was able to produce a better result, and this is what I figured out:
The holes have to be taller – beans (instead of peas) should fit between the rows of Four-Sided stitches.
And the bundling together of two bundles should not be made with a knot or a loop because those would disturb the final appearance. Furthermore, a knot is unnecessary because the bundles are wrapped together again later on.

Thread withdrawal is:

cut 1leave 4
cut 1leave 8
cut 1leave 4
cut 1

Erbslochkante_1From the back of the fabric, Four-Sided stitch rows are worked in the established way.
Erbslochkante_2Then wrapped Peaholes are made. The first bundle of a Peahole is wrapped 8 times from bottom to top. Please take care that the wrapping threads lay parallel and do not cross one another.
Erbslochkante_3The second bundle is wrapped 3 times from top toward the middle.
Erbslochkante_4The two bundles are joined together in the middle with 2
Erbslochkante_5wraps. After the second wrap, the thread is tightened very well. The tighter both bundles are bound together, the sharper the point of the folded Peahole later.
Erbslochkante_6)The second bundle is wrapped 3 times down to the bottom.
Erbslochkante_7After finishing the row
Erbslochkante_8the backs of both Four-Sided stitch rows are laid on top of each other. Small triangles are now on the edge.
Erbslochkante_9Working from the right side of the fabric and from right to left, the needle is brought up in a bottom hole of a Four-Sided stitch between two of the triangles.
Erbslochkante_10Take the needle straight up and wrap once around the right side of the triangle, bringing the needle from the back to the front.
Erbslochkante_11To ease inserting the needle, the Peahole can be unfolded a little bit.
Erbslochkante_12Repeat wrapping as often as needed to bind both layers together (2–3 times).
Bring the needle up in the next Four-Sided stitch bottom hole.
Erbslochkante_13Take the needle straight up, and insert it into the center of the triangle from front to back
Erbslochkante_14and wrap as often as needed to bind the left side of the triangle together. Insert the needle in the center again and bring it up in the next Four-Sided stitch bottom hole.
Erbslochkante_15Continue working in the established way. If needed, draw the triangles up a little bit with the help of your needle.

The back side looks like this:
Erbslochkante_16A nice narrow edging is established. Here it is worked on 13.5/cm thread-count linen using coton à broder No. 30.

Filling Pattern – No. 480

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Nr. 480
category: Limet-Filling pattern
stitches used: bars of 6 Satin stitches over 1 square in the width and Daisy stitches
center: intersection of withdrawn-thread lines (in other shapes or motifs: longitudinal axis = withdrawn-thread line)

The filling pattern shown here is a practice exercise only. You can see it used in a shape in the previous post. It will also be featured in a future post.
First, work a Limet grid by alternately withdrawing 1 and leaving 3 threads both horizontally and vertically.
480_1In the established Limet grid, work a grid of Satin stitches. Work Satin stitch bars over one square (3 threads) in the width and over 2 squares (6 stitches) in the length either in a stair-step manner (please see pattern 469; second and third pictures from the top) or in straight rows as here shown.
480_2Work the rows of Satin stitch bars up
480_3and back by turning the piece 180° and keeping a distance of 2 squares between the bars.
480_4Work rows of Satin stitch bars vertically
480_5and horizontally to establish the Satin stitch grid.
480_6Bring the needle up in a center of any established square,
480_7lay the working thread around a corner of this square, insert the needle in the center again, and bring it up in that corner with the loop beneath the needle.
480_8Tighten the thread in the direction of the loop. A Chain stitch is established. It is secured by inserting the needle just beyond the intersection of fabric threads adjacent to the corner space.
480_9Bring the needle up in the center again
480_10to work the next Chain stitch at the next corner. Work a Chain stitch at each corner of a square (4 Chain stitches per square). Make sure to work clockwise or counterclockwise; this method will keep the center hole well defined and open.
480_11Sometimes it is necessary to slide the working thread through the stitches on the back to arrive at the next starting point.
480_12Work 4 Chain stitches in the established way
480_13like a checkerboard over the entire shape.
480_14All other squares remain unembroidered.
There is a rule in the Schwalm: every Limet square must be embroidered in some way. For example, a Rose stitch could be worked into each of the remaining squares. However, the pattern shown here looks nicer, I think, and if it is used for projects such as Lavender bags, which will not be laundered too often, the pattern will keep for many decades.

Washed, starched and ironed the pattern gets its full charm.
This example was worked on 13.5/cm thread-count Weddigen linen with coton à broder No. 20.

A Lavender Bag with a Needlelace Edging

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Needlelace in its different patterns can be easily practiced on small projects. On this project, you can practice simple needlelace arches.

The linen for a small sachet was embroidered with a filling pattern square,
Beutel_1_1sewn closed, decorated at the upper edge with the folded Peahole edging,
Beutel_1_2and decorated at the bottom edge with needlelace arches.
Beutel_1_3The little sack was filled with lavender and closed with a cord.
Beutel_1_4Such small bags look nice, they are relatively quick and easy to work, and they are very suitable for small gifts.

I will show the detailed steps of working in the next posts.

How to Work a Lampshade

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To make a small lampshade, as shown in the previous post, you will need a frame. The wire frame should have a simple shape. Octagonal frames are especially suited; they look beautiful, are solid, and the wires can be covered later by the seams of the lampshade.

The wire frame must be encased in some kind of coating. The coating has to be pristine without any damage; any blemish that exposes metal can get rusty, and any tiny sharp bits will damage the linen.
These kinds of damages are irreparable.

Also, you will want a matching lamp base.
Lampe2_1The first step is to make a pattern for the lampshade. Because the shape is slightly concaved, it is best to lay a sheet of paper along the frame, to tape it, and then to mark the outside lines along the wires of the respective sections.
Lampe2_2The marked sections are cut and held against the respective sections of the frame to ascertain they really fit.
Lampe2_3Linen for lampshades should be densely woven. Weddigen linen,16/cm thread count, is suitable, but old handwoven linen is better.
It is absolutely necessary to shrink the linen by boiling before cutting to size. If you were to do this step after finishing the lampshade, it would hardly fit around the frame.

Because the single parts are small, it would not be possible to stretch each section in a hoop without wasting a lot of fabric—so, all eight sections are marked on the linen. A 0.5 cm seam allowance should be added to the side edges of each section. At the top edges, a 4 cm allowance is added: this includes a 2 cm fold with a 1.5 cm hem + 0.5 cm fold. At the bottom edges, a 4.5 cm allowance is added: this includes 2.5 cm fold with a 1.5 cm hem + 0.5 cm fold). Place the single sections close to one another. Leave a large enough fabric margin around the group of sections to be able to easily stretch the embroidery in a hoop.
Lampe2_4Also the longitudinal axes are marked. Suitable designs are transferred onto the sections and embroidered as required.

After finishing the embroidery, the pieces are cut out. Either zigzag with a sewing machine or serge the side edges to prevent fraying. The sections are sewn together. Because the lampshade cover should be tightly stretched later, I recommend stitching a double seam for reinforcement.
Lampe2_5The seam allowance should be opened and smoothed. Later, the seam allowances will be arranged around the wires.

Then the top edge and the bottom edge are hemmed (here: 0.5 cm fold and 1.5 cm hem). An opening of about 2 cm is needed to insert a piece of elastic in the hems.
Lampe2_6The bottom edge is folded inwards along the marked line and stitched close to the edge of the fold.
Lampe2_7Along the closely stitched edge, needlelace is worked.
Lampe2_8A piece of elastic or lightweight curtain cord is inserted into the hems. The finished cover is – if needed – washed and ironed and then, from top down, placed over the frame.

The elastic causes the top
Lampe2_9and bottom allowances to fold to the inside of the lampshade frame.
Lampe2_10The seams are adjusted at the wires
Lampe2_11the needlelace is groomed.
Lampe2_12The lampshade is mounted onto a matching base.
Lampe2_13Whether very small or a little bit bigger, lamps with shapes embroidered with Schwalm whitework are always special – individual and attractive!

A Lampshade with a Needlelace Edging

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As already mentioned, needlelace, in the past, was used most often as decoration for clothes; today it is found on other items as well. In my previous post I showed a circular doily with a needlelace edging.

Now I want to show a small lampshade whose bottom edge is decorated with needlelace.
Lampe1_1The needlelace was made in an inverted pyramid shape (3-2-1). A row of picots borders the outside edges of the pyramids and binds them together.
Lampe1_2The lampshade has four wide areas and four narrow areas. Two of the wide areas – oppositely arranged – contain heart and tulip motifs, and the other two wide areas contain heart and sunflower motifs.
Lampe1_3The shapes were filled with different patterns. Same motifs got similar patterns. All heart shapes were filled with openwork filling patterns with a Cable stitch grid. Needle weaving and Rose stitches in different arrangements were worked into the grid.

Needle weaving squares with a Rose stitch in the center.

Needle weaving squares with a Rose stitch in the center.

Needle weaving in a stair-step manner and rows of Rose stitches.

Needle weaving in a stair-step manner and rows of Rose stitches.

Rows of needle weaving and Rose stitch squares.

Rows of needle weaving and Rose stitch squares.

Rose stitches in straight and zigzag lines.

Rose stitches in straight and zigzag lines.

All other shapes in the wide areas were filled with Limet patterns. In the buds, rows of Rose stitches alternate with Satin stitches worked in a stair-step manner.
Rows of Rose stitches and stair-step Satin stitches.

Rows of Rose stitches and stair-step Satin stitches.

Rose stitch grid with Satin stitch bars

Rose stitch grid with Satin stitch bars (Filling pattern 472)

Röserich filling pattern

Röserich filling pattern

on top: Rose stitch squares and Satin stitch bars on bottom: Rose stitch grid with Satin stitch bars

on top: Rose stitch squares and Satin stitch bars
on bottom: Rose stitch grid with Satin stitch bars

on top: Rose stitch squares and fourth blocks of Satin stitches on bottom: Rosen stitch rhombi

on top: Rose stitch squares and fourth blocks of Satin stitches
on bottom: Rosen stitch rhombi

The narrow areas were decorated with six motifs each, arranged from top to bottom.
Circle with a knife point outline, and filled with an openwork pattern with a Cable stitch grid. Into the grid a Rose stitch pattern was worked.

Circle with a knife point outline, and filled with an openwork pattern with a Cable stitch grid. Into the grid a Rose stitch pattern was worked.

Bud with the Limet-Filling pattern Rose stitches.

Bud with the Limet-Filling pattern Rose stitches.

Heart with a Limet-Filling pattern using Satin stitches and Rose stitches.

Heart with a Limet-Filling pattern using Satin stitches and Rose stitches.

Circle with a knife point outline and filled with an openwork pattern with a Cable stitch grid. Into the grid a Rose stitch pattern was worked.

Circle with a knife point outline and filled with an openwork pattern with a Cable stitch grid. Into the grid a Rose stitch pattern was worked.

Tulip with a Limet-Filling pattern using Rose stitches and Four-Sided stitches.

Tulip with a Limet-Filling pattern using Rose stitches and Four-Sided stitches.

Heart with a Limet-Filling pattern using Satin stitch bars and Four-Sided stitches.

Heart with a Limet-Filling pattern using Satin stitch bars and Four-Sided stitches.

A relatively small piece of fabric was embroidered to make this lampshade. By placing the motifs close together, seventeen different filling patterns could be worked; they appear especially beautiful when the light is switched on.
Lampe1_19Using linen for the lampshade creates a delightfully warm light. And the needlelace also produces a lovely effect in this illumination; the edging gives the lampshade that certain something.

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