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Very Fine Linen for Schwalm Whitework

Some days ago I received in the mail a sample of very fine linen. It is pure warp yarn linen – #180 with 20 threads/cm (50.8 tpi) – from the Weddigen weaving mill.

It is nearly an evenweave. I counted 20/18–19 threads/cm (50.8/45.72–48.26 tpi), as the enlarged detail below shows.

The linen has a nice “hand” and looks handsome.

At once I started to test it, and here is the result.
The linen is densely woven. The structure is clear with some typical linen slubs, as the photo on a light pad shows.

Withdrawing threads was easy in both directions. The thread did not break inside the 30 cm of my testing piece.

The subsequent withdrawn-thread line is clear without any fluff.

To test the stitching qualities, I transferred a small design; it will be shown in a future article.

Doing the prep stitches was pleasant. The needle glided smoothly through the linen.
Withdrawing threads was easy, and although my eyesight is no longer very good, I could do it wearing only my glasses; no magnification was needed.

After withdrawing the threads for the openwork grid, only a small amount of fluff remained. Viewing the grid, the slightly uneven weave is noticeable, but it is not at all distracting when working the filling patterns.

The dense weave enables one to place Satin stitches exactly where desired (please note that the picture below is greatly magnified and the piece has not yet been boiled),

and Blanket stitch eyelets (now seen boiled and ironed) can also be stitched with greater precision.

In all this is a wonderful fabric and a treasure for aficionados of fine linen.

Ways to Work Mitered Corners (2)

#2:
Preparing work is the same as in Ways to Work Mitered Corners (1) explained. For the sake of simplicity I repeat it here.

It is important that the hem width (the spacedistance between the withdrawn thread line for the fold and this the withdrawn thread line for securing the hem securing) is the same on both sides of the corner.

Iron your piece and lay it plain flat – right side face down.
Following the thread of the withdrawn thread line for securing the hem securing up to the edgewhere it meets the withdrawn thread line for the fold, mark the point exactlyctly the point. Do the same on the adjacent side of the corner.

Using a #2 pencil draw a diagonal line to connect both marks.

Trim the seam allowance.

Fold the seam allowance.

(One can mark the pencil line using short Running stitches to ease exact folding.)

Fold the fold.

Lay the hem in place and secure it.

Hand sew the corner closed using Blind stitches.

Both methods, done carefully, will produce perfect corners – it makes no difference whether Antique Hems stitches,

Four-Sided stitches,

or Peaholes are used.

Note on a Regional Exhibition

The embroidery circle Guxhagen
shows from 09 to 10 November 2019 a regional Schwalm whitework exhibition.

Detailed information can be found on the homepage.

Ways to Work Mitered Corners (1)

Sometimes people find it difficult to get the mitered corner to exactly match up to the hem layout.

Here are some tips:
It is important that the distance between the withdrawn thread line for the fold and the withdrawn thread line for securing the hem is the same on both sides of the corner.

Iron your piece and lay it flat – right side face down.
Follow the thread of the withdrawn thread line for securing the hem up to where it meets the withdrawn thread line for the fold, mark the point exactly. Do the same on the adjacent side of the corner.

Using a #2 pencil draw a diagonal line to connect both marks.

Now there are two different ways to proceed.

#1:
Fold the piece as shown in the picture below.

Insert a pin along the pencil line.

To make sure that you have folded the fabric exactly, turn the piece over to check that the pin is also lying directly on the pencil line on that side of the fabric.

Sew along the pencil line then trim the seam allowance.


Open up the seam allowance, and smooth it with your thumbnail as far as possible into the corner point.

Turn the hem corner right side out. A pair of scissors with points that are not too sharp can help to define the corner point.

Fold the raw edge along the fold line. First pin and then baste the hem in place.
Secure it using Antique Hem stitches.

Working a Peahole Hem Around a Corner

Peaholes at corners will look perfect only if full Peaholes are worked on both sides of the corner,

and not as shown in the example below.

A Peahole is made by bundling vertical fabric threads using two rows of Four-Sided stitches and then drawing together two of those bundles. So one Peahole needs two bundles, and that means a Peahole hem must have an even number of Four-Sided stitches. For short hems counting out the number of Four-Sided stitches is no problem, but it is cumbersome to count out longer hems. So, a small trick can help

Four-Sided stitches are worked from left to right, bundling usually four vertical fabric threads each stitch.
Work the two rows of Four-Sided stitches as established and stop short before reaching the corner. Let the working threads remain there.

Peaholes are worked from right to left. So, turn the piece now 180°.
This enables a start at the prepared corner to work Peaholes.

Reaching the opposite side, it is no problem to adjust the remaining Four-Sided stitches to the needed number

by working some of them over only three threads

– if more bundles are needed –

or by working some of them over five threads – if less bundles are needed.

A perfect hem arrangement is the result!

Contact

Luzine Happel
Am Schindeleich 43
37269 Eschwege
Deutschland
Telefon: 05651-32233
Website: www.luzine-happel.de
E-Mail: leuchtbergverlag@aol.com

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