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Filling Pattern – No. 546

category: Limet-Filling pattern
linen used: 13.5/cm thread count
threads used: coton à broder No. 20
stitches used: Easy Eyelet stitches and Rose stitches
longitudinal axis: withdrawn thread line
one pattern segment = 16 threads

First, establish a Limet grid with a withdrawn thread line as the longitudinal axis by cutting 1, leaving 3, vertically and horizontally.

Work one row of Easy Eyelet stitches along the longitudinal axis.

Work one vertical row of Rose stitches next to the Easy Eyelet row.

Always alternate working one row of Easy Eyelet stitches and Rose stitches until one half of the shape is filled.

Working from the already embroidered section, fill the remaining section.

Another pattern, suited also for smaller areas, is established.

Schwalm Whitsun Custom – “Pfingstmännchen” and “Pfingstbügel”

The Whitsun custom in the Schwalm is a custom of demand. The children of a village move in a parade from house to house demanding small donations.

The course varies from village to village a little bit, and over the decades small changes to the custom have come about. However, the essence of it remains the same.

On Whitsun Monday, the boys of a village go to the forest. There, one of them is bound with fresh green branches, grass, and moss to be transformed into the Pfingstmännchen (Whitsun manikin).

The whole body is wrapped with branches and greenery. Only small ports allow the boy to look out.

Movement with the thick and heavy framework was cumbersome, but all had fun in it.

It was a special privilege to be the Pfingstmännchen.

The girls of the village brought their most beautiful silk ribbons to a seamstress to decorate a fanciful Pfingstbügel (Whitsun frame). The Pfingstbügel is a half-circle shield that is perched on top of a center staff

or on two side staffs used for carrying. Often the bottom parts of the staffs were decorated with carved or coloured designs or wrapped with ribbons.

One side of the shield is decorated with red bands,

the other side with green bands.

Often a diagonal cross, made of two bands, is an additional decoration. A small flower bouquet is fastened on top.

Wearing their festive costumes and carrying small Schwalm baskets, the girls walk to the forest to fetch the boys.

The girl with the Pfingstbügel is the leader. It is a special privilege to hold the shield. Going out of the village, the red side of the shield is facing forward.

Together with the Pfingstmännchen, they go back to the village to start their parade. Coming back to the village, the green side of the shield is facing forward. It symbolizes the awakening and “greening” of nature.

Dr. Andreas Scheller took the photo below circa 1940.

Back in the village, the children, along with the Pfingstmännchen, go from house to house to collect small donations. Traditionally, donations are eggs, bacon, sweets, and coins. The children recite jingles or sing folk songs.

Following the procession, pancakes are made using the eggs, and all the children have a nice meal together.

A Visit from Hong Kong

Some time ago a lady from Hong Kong visited my exhibition and took a workshop with me. Mimi Chan is a perfect stitcher and interested in all kinds of embroidery. She graduated with distinction from the Royal School of Needlework in the United Kingdom with a diploma in technical hand embroidery. She attained the highest mark ever in the school!

She tours all over the world to learn different regional techniques. At home she teaches all she has learned during her travels in her TOUR Embroidery classes.
After learning about Schwalm whitework, she contacted me to arrange a visit. She had never before worked this technique, but she was familiar with most of the single stitches. So she quickly learned a lot.

She worked through a couple of my books, always showing in short practices that there would be no problem to finish the single subjects on her own.

In the Fall she will return to learn the remaining contents; I’m certain she will leave being a perfect Schwalm embroiderer.

She enjoyed viewing my exhibits, which show the many different possibilities Schwalm whitework provides. She took pictures and created a video, which she put on YouTube and Facebook.

And so, through Mimi, beautiful Schwalm whitework is introduced to another part of the world.

An Easy Eyelet Stitch

Looking at the stitches of Schwalm whitework embroideries, I discovered a new (to me) stitch. It is yet again another example of Schwalm embroiderers’ ingenuity. I immediately set out to try it; in this article, I will share the results of my efforts with you.

The stitch is worked on a Limet grid – cut 1, leave 3. Similar to the Rose stitch, it is a stitch worked in four steps originating from a center. But this stitch is not worked with Blanket stitches; it is worked with Satin stitches. In addition, it is worked counterclockwise instead of clockwise. I did not find a name for this stitch, so I will call it Easy Eyelet stitch.

Instructions for left-handers can be found at the end of this article.

Bring the needle up one square from the bottom (center).

*Cross over one square down, insert the needle and bring it up again in the center hole.

Cross over one square to the right, insert the needle and bring it up again in the center hole. Tighten thread.

Cross over one square up, insert the needle and bring it up again in the center hole. Tighten thread.

Cross over one square to the left, insert the needle and bring it up in the next center hole – one square diagonally right up.*

Start working the steps (*) again. The first step of this stitch shares the same space as the third step of the previously worked stitch. (The threads will lie closely next to each other in the same space.)

The rows are worked from bottom to top. Each hole of the longitudinal axis is a center of a stitch. Tighten the thread so that a distinct hole is made.

Nice open center holes are established.
One row of this stitch can be combined with rows of other stitches – for example Satin stitch bars – to create beautiful striped patterns.
If you want to work a second row, turn the piece 180° and work a second row beside the first.

When working side-by-side rows of this stitch, the working thread will naturally share spaces occupied by previously worked stitches. In these cases, the stitches will lie closely next to each other in the same space.

Two rows of this stitch can be combined with rows of other stitches – for example Satin stitch bars – to create a pattern.
But more rows should not be used. Working row beside row to fill an entire shape establishes the same pattern as Double Crosses – in straight rows/wrong side up (Openwork Pattern Samplers), and this pattern – for filling an entire shape – can be worked much more quickly.

But worked from the back side, the Easy Eyelet stitch can establish a nice pattern for small areas.

The stitches lying alternately straight and at a slant give a unique effect.

Instructions for the left-hander:

*Cross over one square down, insert the needle and bring it up again in the center hole.

Cross over one square to the left, insert the needle and bring it up again in the center hole. Tighten thread.

Cross over one square up, insert the needle and bring it up again in the center hole. Tighten thread.

Cross over one square to the right, insert the needle and bring it up in the next center hole – one square diagonally left up.*

Start working the steps (*) again. The first step of this stitch shares the same space as the third step of the previously worked stitch. (The stitches will lie closely next to each other in the same space.)

The rows are worked from bottom to top. Each hole of the longitudinal axis is a center of a stitch. Tighten thread.

One row of this stitch can be combined with rows of other stitches – for example Satin stitch bars – to create beautiful striped patterns.
If you want to work a second row, turn the piece 180° and work a second row beside the first.

New Thumbnail Images: Overview of Filling Patterns

A distinguishing feature of Schwalm whitework is the enormous variety of different filling patterns. Many of them are already published in my books, but there are many more beautiful patterns for filling areas of any size and shape. Periodically I present filling patterns on my blog – many have been presented in the past and more will be featured in the future.

In 2015 my webmaster installed a blog archive with a thumbnail overview that delighted my readers. The filling patterns are also pictured there, but one has to cull them from all the other subjects.

To improve this situation, I got the idea to install an additional overview that features only filling patterns. My webmaster accomplished the technical requirements and has stocked the new archive with the already published images. Perhaps you have already noticed this archive – it has been up and running for the past few weeks.

But the thumbnail overview should develop in a way so that one can get a direct comparison of the effect of different patterns at first glance. Therefore all patterns should have approximately the same size, and they should be photographed from the same angle.

To accomplish this I embroidered many hours these past weeks. Four big samplers are already in the works, and a fifth will follow. When all samplers are finished, I will be able to present about 210 patterns that have not been shown so far – neither in my books nor on my blog. Some of them are completely new!

For the samplers I chose Weddigen linen with a 13.5/cm thread count (article 160) cut to 50 cm X 185 cm. In the end I will use them as drapes. Weighted at the bottom, they will hang plain, and the patterns will be especially effective illuminated from behind.

The pattern areas measure approximately 7.5 cm X 7.5 cm. So that all squares of one sampler get the exact same size, I divided the patterns into groups. (Valuable tips for the division and the arrangement of pattern samplers are found in my book Samplers).

So here is one sampler with only Limet patterns with a square in the center,

and another with only Limet patterns with an intersection of withdrawn-thread lines in the center.

One sampler shows only openwork patterns with an intersection of pairs of threads in the center, and one with only openwork patterns with a square in the center will follow.

I intend to fill the fifth sampler with patterns needing special thread withdrawing.

In the overview, only the pictures of the figural patterns should remain as they are.

With this prep work I am getting much closer to my goal of presenting my new thumbnail overview in the most effective and attractive way. Having first established a perfect format, I will be able to manage this special overview well, and we all can watch it grow and grow. The many beautiful patterns that have been published in my books will not be presented, because I do not want to put my paying customers at a disadvantage.

The new thumbnail overview of the pattern archive can be a very valuable tool when looking for a pattern to match a special shape. So I hope you will find it useful and visit often.

To find the new scrolling overview, please click to the blog via the link in the header of my website. You will find three scrolling overviews (blog posts, free designs, and filling patterns) in the right-hand margin. By clicking anywhere on the scrolling images, an overview page will open.

Contact

Luzine Happel
Am Schindeleich 43
37269 Eschwege
Deutschland
Telefon: 05651-32233
Website: www.luzine-happel.de
E-Mail: leuchtbergverlag@aol.com

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