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Filling Pattern – No. 545

category: Limet-Filling pattern
stitches used: nine-stitch sections of the simple Square Eyelet, Four-Sided, and Rose
center: square (in other shapes, longitudinal axis: group of three threads)
one pattern segment = 24 threads

used here: linen with 13.5/cm threads and coton à broder No. 25 for the small shirt buttons and No. 20 for the Rose stitches

Instructions for left-handers can be found at the end of this article.

First, establish a Limet grid with a square in the center by cutting 1, leaving 3 both vertically and horizontally.

Work one small shirt button around the center square. After completing the Four-Sided stitch, bring the needle up in the next center – three squares (nine fabric threads) up and four squares (twelve fabric threads) to the right. The travelling working thread on the back is covered later by subsequent stitches.

From there work a second small shirt button. Continue working small shirt buttons in the established way.

Work small shirt buttons over the entire shape.

Start working a square of 4 X 4 Rose stitches one square (three fabric threads) up from the top right corner of a small shirt button.

Work four Rose stitches in a straight row up,

three more Rose stitches each across the top of the square to the left, down the left side, and along the bottom to the right. From the last Rose stitch start working a Four-Sided stitch in the center.

Work the first stitch on top from left to right,

the second stitch on bottom from left to right;

the third stitch is taken on the left downward from the top.

And the fourth stitch is taken on the right downward from the top.

From there bring the needle up in the next center of a Rose stitch – one square (three fabric threads) up from the top right corner of the small shirt button to the left. Work Rose stitch squares with Four-Sided stitches in the centers in the established way until the entire shape is filled.

This nice pattern can also be worked in shapes on the bias,

as seen here in the tulip shape.

But remember that the Limet grid is prepared differently for shapes positioned on the bias. Please refer to this article

and then continue in the established way.

Instructions for the left-hander:

Work one small shirt button around the center square. After completing the fourth Four-Sided stitch, bring the needle up in the next center – three squares (nine fabric threads) up and four squares (twelve fabric threads) to the left. The travelling working thread in the back is covered later by subsequent stitches.

From there work a second small shirt button. Continue working small shirt buttons in the established way.
Work small shirt buttons over the entire shape.

Start working a square of 4 X 4 Rose stitches one square (three fabric threads) up from the top left corner of a small shirt button.

Work four Rose stitches in a straight row up,

three more Rose stitches each across the top of the square to the right, down the right side, and along the bottom to the left. From the last Rose stitch start working a Four-Sided stitch in the center.

Work the first stitch on top from right to left,

the second stitch on bottom from right to left;

the third stitch is taken on the right downward from the top.

And the fourth stitch on the left downward from the top.

From there bring the needle up in the next center of a Rose stitch – one square (three fabric threads) up from the top left corner of the small shirt button to the right. Work Rose stitch squares with Four-Sided stitches in the centers in the established way until the entire shape is filled.

How to Establish a Limet Grid (3)

Below are the instructions for Limet grids in shapes positioned on the bias.

A pattern embellishment in a symmetrical shape will look perfect only if it is symmetrically arranged.
Circles, ovals, and squares are point symmetric; they need an intersection of withdrawn-thread lines at their centers from which the pattern can radiate in all directions – it makes no difference if the shape lies on the straight of grain or on the bias.

Tulips, hearts, and some other shapes are axially symmetric; they need intersections of withdrawn-thread lines along the center axis from which the pattern can be established on both sides.

For all shapes other than circles, the center axis is marked first (best with a light pen line on the back of the fabric – thread withdrawal is also done from the back side).

In point-symmetric shapes, the center horizontal (or vertical) thread is now withdrawn.

Afterwards, to establish the center intersection of withdrawn-thread lines that meet the marked axis, the center vertical (or horizontal) thread is withdrawn.

For axially-symmetric shapes any thread that crosses the marked center axis is withdrawn; it makes no difference to begin with a horizontal or vertical thread.

In shapes with deep interior points (e.g., some tulips), it is possible – but not absolutely necessary – to begin withdrawing the threads directly below the interior point.

The next thread to be withdrawn is perpendicular to the first withdrawn-thread line; it intersects the first withdrawn-thread line at the marked line.

From the first two withdrawn-thread lines (vertical and horizontal), the Limet grid is established by alternately leaving 3 (or sometimes 4) and cutting 1.

So far, I have featured only one filling pattern that needs such a Limet grid:
No. 471

The Rose Stitch – Worked in Vertical Rows

When working the Rose stitch, please remember that a Rose stitch is established by working 4 Blanket stitches – all loops originating from the same point with the “legs” placed at right angles to one another (forming a cross).

The Rose Stitch article explained how to work Rose stitches in diagonal rows in a Limet grid.

Rose stitches can also be worked in vertical rows. (Instructions for left-handers are at the end of this article.) In this example, the first stitch is taken to the left,

and the work continues clockwise with stitching the second,

the third,

and the fourth stitch.

After crossing over the fourth stitch to the left and inserting the needle at the bottom of the center hole, bring the needle up in the next center, one square (three threads) up (it is directly above the top stitch of the Rose stitch just worked).

From there, start to work the next Rose stitch in the established way.

The fourth stitch of this Rose stitch shares the same space as the second stitch of the previously worked Rose stitch. (The stitches will lie closely next to each other in the same space.)

The rows are worked from bottom to top. Each hole of the longitudinal axis is a center of a Rose stitch.

Making every second hole of the longitudinal axis a center of a Rose stitch creates a variation that is found in

filling pattern No. 543.

Instructions for the left-hander:

To work Rose stitches in straight rows, the first stitch is taken to the right,

and the work continues counterclockwise with stitching the second,

the third,

and the fourth stitch.

After crossing over the fourth stitch to the right and inserting the needle at the bottom of the center hole, bring the needle up in the next center, one square (three threads) up (it is directly above the top stitch of the Rose stitch just worked).

From there, start to work the next Rose stitch in the established way.

The fourth stitch of this Rose stitch shares the same space as the second stitch of the previously worked Rose stitch. (The stitches will lie closely next to each other in the same space.)

The rows are worked from bottom to top. Each hole of the longitudinal axis is a center of a Rose stitch.

Especially for Left-Hander

More and more left-handed people want to learn Schwalm whitework. So I have decided to increase my service in this respect. Perhaps you have already noticed the special instructions for left-handed people in my latest blog posts regarding filling patterns. In future articles I will continue to include left-handed instructions using the same format as seen in Filling Pattern 543 and Filling Pattern 544.

During my many years of teaching, I often cooperated with left-handers, and so I was able to gain different perspectives. Some of them told me that when they were young they had to learn to embroider using the right hand. But even with a lot of practice stitching with the right hand, using the right hand will never feel 100 percent natural to the left-hander. Stitching will be a strain and less enjoyable for the left-hander forced to conform to right-handed methods.

Others suggested to turn the instruction books upside down to get the correct view of the images, but this is not true for all stitches. Moreover, the accompanying text is not readable in this position.

For some techniques like Cross stitch, where one only needs to learn one stitch, it is conceivably possible for the left-hander to work without special instructions.

But Schwalm whitework is made special by the multitude of different stitches used in one project. And this makes learning it difficult for all, but left-handers are especially overwhelmed without exact instructions.

Years ago, at the request of and in cooperation with a young lady, I decided to publish a left-hander edition of my basic book. The left-hander edition was totally revised with new text and pictures. The young lady worked step-by-step using my instructions and did not experience any difficulties. Later translations to English and French followed. With the help of Mary Corbet´s website, I found embroiderers to test my English publication. They also did not have difficulties following my instructions, but they found the project much too elaborate for a beginner. It is, and will continue to be, a good reference book for advanced embroiderers.

Next I reworked – for the left-hander – my lesson #1 booklet. I received many thanks and compliments for “such great left-handed instructions” but also requests for more left-hander instructions. Now all my lesson booklets have an edition specifically written for the left-hander. They are available in my shop.

Details of the contents are found in the following blog posts:

New Lessons for Beginners – An Overview

Lesson #1 for lefthander – Happel Hearts

Lesson #2 for left hander – Tulip Wreath

Lesson #3 for left-hander – Openwork Circle Design Ornaments

Lesson #4 for left-hander – Needle-Weaving Band Sampler

Finally left-handers can also learn – without going against their natural inclinations – all the many facets of beautiful, diverse, and immensely interesting Schwalm whitework.

Do you know left-handed embroiderers? Please feel free to forward this good news to them.

Filling Pattern – No. 544

Filling Pattern – No. 544

category: Limet-Filling pattern
stitches used: nine-stitch sections of the simple Square Eyelet and Four-Sided stitches
center: square (in other shapes, longitudinal axis: group of three threads)
one pattern segment = 12 threads
name: small shirt button

used here: linen with 13.5/cm threads and coton à broder No. 25

New: Instructions for left-handers can be found at the end of this article.

First, establish a Limet grid with a square in the center by cutting 1, leaving 3 both vertically and horizontally.

Bring the needle up in bottom left hole of the center square (point where the needle emerges = center of the nine-stitch section), and pull the thread through.

Turn the piece 180°, cross over three threads to the right and one thread down, insert the needle and bring it up in the center again. Tighten thread.

From the center (of the nine-stitch section) work four more stitches moving one fabric thread up with each stitch.

Rotate the piece 90° clockwise and continue stitching around the corner – working four stitches upward.

After the ninth stitch, take the needle to the back and bring it up in the center of the next nine-stitch section – the next counterclockwise corner hole of the center square.

Work the next nine-stitch section in the established way.

From the last stitch of the fourth nine-stitch section, bring the needle up in the bottom right hole of the center square. It is important to choose the opposite side for starting the Four-Sided stitch to get the corner holes clean and open and the stitch centered.

Work a Four-Sided stitch around the center square with the first stitch on the right and straight up;

the second stitch is taken on the left and up. With this stitch the thread can be tightened a little bit more. In contrast to the Satin stitch sections, where the thread is only tightened so that the stitches lie flat, the thread of the Four-Sided stitch can be tightened a little bit more to pull together the threads of the center square.

Work the third stitch on the bottom from right to left,

and the fourth on the top from right to left.

From there bring the needle up in the next center, one square (three fabric threads) down and three squares (nine fabric threads) to the right.
Please make sure to secure your working thread through the backs of stitches when travelling to the new starting point.

From the next center work a small shirt button in the established way beside the first.

Continue working small shirt buttons

to fill the entire shape.

Pattern No. 451 is a combined pattern using small shirt button as one element.

Instructions for the left-hander:

Bring the needle up in bottom right hole of the center square (point where the needle emerges = center of the nine-stitch section), and pull the thread through.

Turn the piece 180°, cross over three threads to the left and one thread down, insert the needle and bring it up in the center again. Tighten thread.

From the center (of the nine-stitch section) work four more stitches moving one fabric thread up with each stitch.

Rotate the piece 90° counterclockwise and continue stitching around the corner – work four stitches upward.

After the ninth stitch, take the needle to the back and bring it up in the center of the next nine-stitch section – the next clockwise corner hole of the center square.

Work the next nine-stitch section in the established way.

From the last stitch of the fourth nine-stitch section, bring the needle up in the bottom left hole of the center square. It is important to choose the opposite side for starting with the Four-Sided stitch to get the corner holes clean and open and the stitch centered.

Work a Four-Sided stitch around the center square with the first stitch on the left and straight up;

the second stitch is taken on the right and up. With this stitch the thread can be tightened a little bit more. In contrast to the Satin stitch sections, where the thread is only tightened so that the stitches lie flat, the thread of the Four-Sided stitch can be tightened a little bit more to pull together the threads of the center square.

Work the third stitch on the bottom from left to right,

and the fourth on the top from left to right.

From there bring the needle up in the next center, one square (three fabric threads) down and three squares (nine fabric threads) to the left.
Please make sure to secure your working thread through the backs of stitches when travelling to the new starting point.

From the next center work a small shirt button in the established way beside the first.

Work one small shirt button beside the next, and continue working small shirt buttons

to fill the entire shape.

Contact

Luzine Happel
Am Schindeleich 43
37269 Eschwege
Deutschland
Telefon: 05651-32233
Website: www.luzine-happel.de
E-Mail: leuchtbergverlag@aol.com

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