Lesson #4 – Needle-Weaving Band Sampler

Lesson #4 is a stand-alone unit that only requires some basic knowledge of embroidery. It deals with different needle-weaving band patterns. Needle-weaving hems or bands are, next to the Peahole hem, most important in Schwalm whitework; there are more than 200 different known patterns.


In needle-weaving bands fabric with a linen weave is transformed by withdrawing fabric threads in one direction and replacing them with embroidery threads that are woven in different patterns.


The lesson #4 booklet expands and improves, with very detailed descriptions, similar content found in my book Fancy Hems. The six on the front page shown band patterns are explained.

You will learn how to
• establish thread bundles,
• establish bridges,
• secure withdrawn thread ends,
• work units,
• change the width of bridges,
• read a diagram,
• remove extra bundles,
• increase the number of bundles, and
• work spiders.


In addition, you will learn how to work
• one-piece block patterns,
• A-patterns, and
• a two-piece block pattern with spiders.


Schwalm Whitework
Lesson #4
Needle-Weaving Band Sampler
47 pages
more than 200 images
text: English
plastic comb binding
item price: €25 (including 7% sales tax), €23.36 for customers outside the EU
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The project in the booklet is worked on 14 threads/cm natural coloured linen from the Übelhör linen mill in Austria. One can use any evenweave (or nearly evenweave) linen that is densely woven with a thread count between 13.5/cm and 16/cm. Weddigen linen #160 with 13.5 threads/cm is well suited.
But if one wants to have the same linen to get the same result as shown in the booklet, a kit is available. Kit #4 contains all materials required to complete lesson #4.

Lesson #3 – Openwork Circle Design Ornaments

Of the three types of withdrawn-thread patterns (simple, Limet, and openwork) in Schwalm whitework, openwork is the most important and richly diverse group. This is because shapes can not only be filled with endless patterns but also with figured patterns. The variety of figured patterns is vast – in addition to hearts, tulips and stars, birds and manikin are found. However, one can also find other animals and crowns. The Schwalm embroiderer loved diversification and liked to combine all the different possibilities.


Openwork patterns are especially durable because the embroiderer usually embroidered the shape twice – once for securing the grid with Cable stitches and again when working a pattern using Rose or needle-weaving stitches into the established grid. Learning to embroider openwork patterns is a little bit more arduous. But having learned the basic principles, countless and very different creative possibilities are opened up.

linienförmige Anordnung | arrangement in a straight line
The Ornament project is a continuation of the Happel Hearts project. It provides the opportunity to practice Coral Knot, Chain, and Blanket stitches that you learned in lesson #1, and it introduces new techniques and challenges:

1. Design transfer of a circle design
2. Thread withdrawal for an openwork grid with a square in the center
3. Working a Cable stitch grid
4. Openwork filling stitch: needle weaving
5. Working from a filling pattern chart
6. Openwork filling stitch: Rose stitch
7. Finishing
8. Thread withdrawal for an openwork grid with an intersection of bundled threads in the center

In addition, you will
• create your own different edge embellishment in basic star pattern charts,
• create your own star pattern chart,
• study more different pattern charts,
• study more embroidered star patterns.


The main focus of this lesson is to introduce Schwalm whitework’s third type of withdrawn-thread patterns – openwork patterns. (Simple withdrawn-thread filling patterns and Limet-Filling patterns have already been covered in lesson #1 and in lesson #2 respectively.)


In this lesson you have to establish an openwork grid, stabilize it with Cable stitches, and fill it with different figured patterns using needle weaving and Rose stitches. In the end, excess fabric is cut away.

Other finishing possibilities are square ornaments, coasters, and bands.


The project is small, but there is so much to learn!
Everything you need is included in the kit #1. Did you order it already?
To save you shipping costs, I made this document downloadable. Of course, a printed version is available upon request; should you prefer this option, please email me.

Schwalm Whitework
Lesson #3
Openwork Circle Design Ornaments
31 pages
more than100 images
text: English
21.95 MB file size
item price: € 20 (including 19 % sales tax), 16,81 € for customers outside the EU

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Lesson #2 – Tulip Wreath

The Tulip Wreath project is a little more ambitious than the lesson #1 projects – the Happel Hearts.

It provides the opportunity to practice Coral Knot and Chain stitches that you learned in lesson #1, and it introduces new techniques and challenges:

1. *Working on a finer linen (16 threads per cm)
2. *Working with a pre-transferred design
3. Tendrils and forks using Coral Knot stitches
4. Small leaves and small flowers using Satin stitches
5. Thread withdrawal for a Limet grid on the straight of grain

6. Thread withdrawal for a Limet grid on the bias
7. Eight different Limet-Filling patterns

8. Hemming with the Peahole hem
9. *Laundering a pre-transferred design

The most widely used linen for Schwalm whitework is linen with 16 threads per cm (Weddigen article 925). In lesson #1 you used the linen I recommend for beginners, linen with a lower thread count – 13.5 threads per cm (Weddigen article 160).

One of the goals of lesson #2 is to learn how to embroider on the finer linen. But in the proofing tests some of the ladies found it difficult to use this linen, so the lesson was redesigned. Now the same design and the same steps can be worked optionally on either the 16 threads per cm or the 13.5 threads per cm linen. As previously mentioned, the kit for lesson #1 also includes a small sample piece of linen with 16 threads per cm; it is included so that one can determine whether or not they are comfortable using this finer linen. The result is the same tulip wreath, but the size of the finer linen cloth is smaller.

There is also an add-on option for lesson #2: pre-cut linen with the design already transferred. A benefit of pre-transferred designs is that one can start embroidering at once – without doing the laborious task of transferring the design first. Also the colour of pre-transferred designs is very durable. It will not fade while working, which can happen when using iron transfer in larger designs. However, pre-transferred designs will need more work (soaking, boiling, and rubbing several times) to remove the colour after the embroidery is completed. But in the end it does disappear; I can attest to this since I have embroidered many such pre-transferred designs.

For people who do not want linen with the design pre-transferred, the design is included in two different sizes in the booklet. Please note that design transfer is not a subject covered in this lesson.

For the project worked with 16 per cm thread-count linen you will need:
linen (blank or with pre-transferred design) cut to about 45 cm X 45 cm
a small linen sample for practicing
coton à broder No. 20 – 1 skein; No. 25 – 1 skein, and No. 30 – 2 skeins
Chenille needle No. 26
Tapestry needle No. 26

All these items are included in kit #2A.

For the project worked with 13.5 per cm thread-count linen you will need:
linen (blank or with pre-transferred design) cut to at least 55 cm X 55 cm
a small linen sample for practicing
coton à broder No. 16 – 1 skein; No. 20 – 2 skein; and No. 30 – 3 skeins
Chenille needle No. 24
Chenille needle No. 26
Tapestry needle No. 26

All these items are included in kit #2B


Schwalm Whitework
Lesson #2
Tulip Wreath
82 pages
more than 250 images
text: English
plastic comb binding
item price: € 25 (including 7% sales tax), 23.36 € for customers outside the EU
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Lesson #1 – Happel Hearts

Schwalm whitework – Have you been wishing to learn the beautiful and exceedingly interesting embroidery technique, but no opportunity presented itself?
Well, the opportunity is here! With my detailed lesson booklets written for beginners, you can now learn Schwalm whitework easily and comfortably in your own home completely self directed.

Schwalm whitework consists of a variety of specific techniques, and not all techniques can be learned at once. If you like Schwalm whitework, you can learn to love working it! You can thoroughly learn all the basic steps of Schwalm whitework with my lesson #1 booklet.

Schwalm whitework incorporates three different withdrawn-thread patterns:
• simple – every fourth fabric thread is withdrawn in one direction only
• Limet – every fourth fabric thread is withdrawn in both directions
• openwork – pairs of threads are withdrawn between pairs of remaining threads in both directions For each type a wide range of different fillings patterns are available.


In this lesson you will learn to work the simple withdrawn-thread patterns only. But as you can see in the pictures, you will still have many options. Nine patterns are described in great detail; many suggestions for modifying the patterns are given.

Schwalm whitework provides only nine basic stitches for establishing the infinite variety of filling patterns. Lesson #1 imparts already three of them – Honeycomb Darning, Wave, and Satin stitches.


Lesson #1 imparts the most important basic elements in nine steps:

1. Design transfer
2. Thread preparation
3. Coral Knot stitches
4. Blanket stitch half-eyelet scallops
5. Chain stitches
6. Thread withdrawal for a simple drawn thread filling pattern
7. Filling patterns – please choose one of three different patterns
8. Laundering
9. Finishing.

Should you wish to continue your Schwalm whitework studies, the project booklet includes an additional six filling patterns that are a little more difficult.
For your first small project you will work a heart, which can be cut out or framed in the end.


Other finishing possibilities are square or heart-shaped pincushions and bands.


If you are left-handed, no problem! This lesson booklet is available in two different formats – written for left-handers or right-handers.

Another added benefit of the lesson booklets is that you will not be left wondering how to proceed further in your studies. If you are satisfied with your results and want to learn more, other lesson booklets – each introducing new Schwalm whitework techniques – are available.

Because your success depends on your using the right materials, I highly recommend that you order kit #1 along with the Lesson #1 booklet.


Schwalm Whitework
Lesson #1
Happel Hearts
53 pages
more than 140 images
text: English
plastic comb binding
item price: € 25 (including 7% sales tax), 23.36 € for customers outside the EU
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New Lessons for Beginners – An Overview

As I grow older I begin to think of rounding off my publications so to ensure the continued interest in and working of Schwalm whitework.

My book Basic Principles of Schwalm Whitework has been well received. Schwalm embroiderers like it and have it always at their fingertips. However, these embroiderers have also told me that the book’s project is much too ambitious for beginners.

And so, I took out small parts, described them in substantially more detail, and added many more step-by-step pictures. I now plan to offer four different lessons for beginners. They will allow one to learn – completely self directed – the extensive techniques of Schwalm whitework step by step. All instructions have been proofed by many students.

The publications are:
Lesson #1 – Happel Hearts
Lesson #2 – Tulip Wreath
Lesson #3 – Openwork Circle Design Ornaments
Lesson #4 – Needle-Weaving Band Sampler

Although the first lesson – Happel Hearts – has already been presented as an online class n, each of the lessons will be discussed in greater detail in future articles.

Lesson #1 will now be offered without my online help. However, for one to succeed it is important to learn about the materials used in Schwalm whitework. For that reason I will offer a kit containing all the needed supplies. (Details of the kit will be included in a future article.) For your convenience, the kit will include all supplies needed for lesson #1 and lesson #3. There will also be a small sample of the linen used in lesson #2.

A newcomer to Schwalm whitework should absolutely start their studies with lesson #1. After completing this lesson, one can choose to continue either with lesson #2 or with lesson #3. Lesson #4 is a stand-alone unit that only requires some basic knowledge of embroidery.

The lesson booklets are also well suited for Schwalm teachers. The step-by-step instructions and many pictures will enhance and support a teacher’s lesson.

A word about the linen, Schwalm whitework is a combination of surface embroidery and drawn thread work. It is worked on densely woven pure linen. The dense weave enables perfect surface embroidery like leaves, stems, small flowers, eyelets, and tendrils. And withdrawing threads facilitates stitching the filling patterns into the shapes.

The most widely used linen for Schwalm whitework is linen with 16 threads per cm (Weddigen article 925). But for beginners it is difficult to withdraw the fabric threads of this linen. So all lessons (#1, #3, and #4) that deal mostly with this subject are worked on linen with a lower thread count – 13.5 threads per cm (Weddigen article 160).

One of the goals of lesson #2 was to learn how to embroider on the finer linen. But in the proofing tests some of the ladies found it difficult to use this linen. So the lesson was redesigned. Now the same design and the same steps can be worked optionally on either the 16 threads per cm or the 13.5 threads per cm linen. As mentioned above, the kit for lesson #1 will also include a small sample piece of linen with16 threads per cm.

Please anticipate more information on the individual lessons soon.

Coming soon:
All booklets and kits are ready for purchase, however they have not yet been added to my online shop. If you would like to purchase or have any questions regarding these items, please email me at leuchtbergverlag@aol.com.