Ways to Work Mitered Corners (2)

#2:
Preparing work is the same as in Ways to Work Mitered Corners (1) explained. For the sake of simplicity I repeat it here.

It is important that the hem width (the spacedistance between the withdrawn thread line for the fold and this the withdrawn thread line for securing the hem securing) is the same on both sides of the corner.

Iron your piece and lay it plain flat – right side face down.
Following the thread of the withdrawn thread line for securing the hem securing up to the edgewhere it meets the withdrawn thread line for the fold, mark the point exactlyctly the point. Do the same on the adjacent side of the corner.

Using a #2 pencil draw a diagonal line to connect both marks.

Trim the seam allowance.

Fold the seam allowance.

(One can mark the pencil line using short Running stitches to ease exact folding.)

Fold the fold.

Lay the hem in place and secure it.

Hand sew the corner closed using Blind stitches.

Both methods, done carefully, will produce perfect corners – it makes no difference whether Antique Hems stitches,

Four-Sided stitches,

or Peaholes are used.

Ways to Work Mitered Corners (1)

Sometimes people find it difficult to get the mitered corner to exactly match up to the hem layout.

Here are some tips:
It is important that the distance between the withdrawn thread line for the fold and the withdrawn thread line for securing the hem is the same on both sides of the corner.

Iron your piece and lay it flat – right side face down.
Follow the thread of the withdrawn thread line for securing the hem up to where it meets the withdrawn thread line for the fold, mark the point exactly. Do the same on the adjacent side of the corner.

Using a #2 pencil draw a diagonal line to connect both marks.

Now there are two different ways to proceed.

#1:
Fold the piece as shown in the picture below.

Insert a pin along the pencil line.

To make sure that you have folded the fabric exactly, turn the piece over to check that the pin is also lying directly on the pencil line on that side of the fabric.

Sew along the pencil line then trim the seam allowance.


Open up the seam allowance, and smooth it with your thumbnail as far as possible into the corner point.

Turn the hem corner right side out. A pair of scissors with points that are not too sharp can help to define the corner point.

Fold the raw edge along the fold line. First pin and then baste the hem in place.
Secure it using Antique Hem stitches.

Working a Peahole Hem Around a Corner

Peaholes at corners will look perfect only if full Peaholes are worked on both sides of the corner,

and not as shown in the example below.

A Peahole is made by bundling vertical fabric threads using two rows of Four-Sided stitches and then drawing together two of those bundles. So one Peahole needs two bundles, and that means a Peahole hem must have an even number of Four-Sided stitches. For short hems counting out the number of Four-Sided stitches is no problem, but it is cumbersome to count out longer hems. So, a small trick can help

Four-Sided stitches are worked from left to right, bundling usually four vertical fabric threads each stitch.
Work the two rows of Four-Sided stitches as established and stop short before reaching the corner. Let the working threads remain there.

Peaholes are worked from right to left. So, turn the piece now 180°.
This enables a start at the prepared corner to work Peaholes.

Reaching the opposite side, it is no problem to adjust the remaining Four-Sided stitches to the needed number

by working some of them over only three threads

– if more bundles are needed –

or by working some of them over five threads – if less bundles are needed.

A perfect hem arrangement is the result!

I have been asked … (3)

Embroiderers have asked me questions regarding the order of the prep work for Peahole and needle-weaving hems.

They want to know why the two rows of Four-Sided stitches are made first before withdrawing the threads between (method 1),

and not after withdrawing all the threads (method 2) as some other authors show.

My response:

Of course, using method 2 it would be easier to check that one always takes up the same vertical threads on the lower row that were taken up on the upper row to establish the needed thread bundles. Errors in bundling could be avoided.

But working Four-Sided stitches along a section without the bordering horizontal threads, because they are withdrawn already, is much more difficult – especially in wider hems or when working without a hoop.

So, after weighing the pros and cons, in my mind the advantage of method 1 predominates.

This is the reason why I explain to withdraw only two threads with a distance of four threads between to establish the first row of Four-sided stitches, and then, at the desired distance from the first, doing the same to establish the second row of Four-sided stitches.

Make sure, that you always take up the same vertical threads as you have taken in the upper row. Check it every few stitches! (It is easier to check it, when the previously worked row is on top of the new row and not below it.)

The remaining threads between are withdrawn after finishing both Four-Sided stitch rows. In addition, it is important to work all stitches using a hoop.

Four-Sided Stitches in Rows

Did you also learn to work rows of Four-Sided stitches like me – from the front of the fabric and from right to left?

Working hundreds of hems using Four-Sided stitches, I discovered a much easier and faster way of stitching. It is worked from the back of the fabric and from left to right.

Working this way is going to be the least stressful on your wrist joint, because in two of the needed three stitches it is held straight,

and for only one stitch it is bent.

Did you test it already?